• A Family Pharmacy

    Cherry’s Pharmacy Serves Up Custom-Flavored Medicine And Good Advice On The Upper East Side


    Cherry’s Pharmacy,
    a family-oriented pharmacy located on
    East 66th Street, is one of the few pharmacies to cater
    specifically to the needs of children in the city. They offer custom-flavored
    medicine for even the most stubborn swallower, a strong knowledge base to calm
    stressed-out parents, and a friendly, welcoming atmosphere that charms parents
    and children alike. We chatted with Cherry’s owner, Charles Tabouchirani, about
    the pharmacy as well as the latest in flu prevention and treatment.

    Can you tell us a bit about Cherry’s and
    its history?

    It’s a pharmacy
    that specializes in child health. We are six years old and we’re going strong.
    We’re well-known for flavoring medications and custom-making medications to fit
    a child’s needs.

    How do you cater to children and
    families? How is the experience at Cherry’s different for kids than at generic
    pharmacy?

    We really don’t
    want to compete with chain stores. We have a different service, the overall
    atmosphere is welcoming, especially for a kid. We have a Thomas the Tank table
    and an electric train going around the ceiling. The first impression is very
    friendly, warm, and welcoming; the staff is extremely knowledgeable and we try
    to put ourselves in the places of the parents and the patients. We’re always
    available in person or over the phone and the phones are always picked up, you’re
    never shifted from prompt to prompt. Also, 80% of our business is deliveries
    throughout
    Manhattan, and shipping everywhere makes us more
    accessible. People, especially parents, crave information and access, and
    that’s what we try to provide at all times.

    What is your favorite part of working and
    owning Cherry’s?

    I’m passionate
    about what I do and I always loved working with children. My favorite part is
    being the owner of Cherry’s, especially in terms of creativity—I’m always
    coming up with new ideas for customer experience. I also enjoy just coming in to
    work and helping people. You really have to live the philosophy; Cherry’s
    Pharmacy is my second home.

    As the fall season approaches, a lot of
    families are concerned about keeping their kids safe and protected from the
    flu. What tips would you give to parents to help promote healthy flu prevention
    habits in youngsters?

    Always clean and
    wash your hands, soap and water works just as well as a bottle of Purell. When
    a child is at school, explain to them that you don’t share things like water
    bottles or each other’s lunches. Parents should also be able to teach their
    children the proper way to cover their mouths when they cough. Also, the flu
    season is November to March, so instead of being overwhelmed in the heart of
    the season, vaccinate your child early. Those are really basic things that can
    go a long way.

    Are there any products or
    over-the-counter medications you recommend in particular? What is your go-to
    recommendation to combat the flu?

    There’s really
    no one product; the flu is a virus. However, the thing that comes to mind is
    good hygiene, washing your hands, or pocket-sized Purell. One other product
    that’s good for older kids is a medication in the form of pellets called
    oscilloccinum; it’s really for flu-like symptoms; body aches, chill, and fever.
    Tamiflu is a treatment, not a preventative, but it’s always good to have
    ibuprofen or Tylenol on had for fever-like symptoms.

    Are there any homeopathic remedies or
    defenses do you recommend for flu prevention?

    Oscilloccinum is
    one of the most common homeopathic flu preventatives.

    Since we live in the city and often
    commute to work or school, can you provide some tips on how to prevent catching
    the flu while riding public transportation?

    I would say be
    careful when someone coughs or sneezes next to you; it’s tough when you’re
    traveling, so try to keep hand sanitizer in your purse, diaper bag or
    backpack. There’s no ideal way to prevent the flu, but proper hygiene such as
    washing your hands or using hand sanitizer asap is the best policy.

    In addition to choosing their own
    medicine flavors, are there any other ways you encourage children to take an
    active role in their health at Cherry’s Pharmacy?

    Selecting their
    flavor allows them to be a part of the decision-making process and is also a
    big part of having them take and respond positively to their medications. Also,
    depending on if they are old enough to understand our directions, we speak to
    both the children and parents directly so they can understand why they are
    taking their medications as well as how to take them. It’s very important to
    empower kids with that knowledge; it makes them compliant rather than having to
    force them to take their medicine.

    In your experience, what are some of the
    biggest mistakes parents make when their child is sick?

    The first
    mistake parents make is panicking, and of course the child senses that. Parents
    should tap into resources such as pharmacists to answer questions about
    medication and their side effects; lack of knowledge tends to create panic.
    Sometimes we encourage parents to bring them to Cherry’s and once here, we give
    the first dose and it goes over very well.

    Cherry’s Pharmacy, 207 East 66th Street, 212-717-7797, cherryspharmacy.com.

    A Family Pharmacy

    Cherry’s Pharmacy Serves Up Custom-Flavored Medicine And Good Advice On The Upper East Side


    Cherry’s Pharmacy,
    a family-oriented pharmacy located on
    East 66th Street, is one of the few pharmacies to cater
    specifically to the needs of children in the city. They offer custom-flavored
    medicine for even the most stubborn swallower, a strong knowledge base to calm
    stressed-out parents, and a friendly, welcoming atmosphere that charms parents
    and children alike. We chatted with Cherry’s owner, Charles Tabouchirani, about
    the pharmacy as well as the latest in flu prevention and treatment.

    Can you tell us a bit about Cherry’s and
    its history?

    It’s a pharmacy
    that specializes in child health. We are six years old and we’re going strong.
    We’re well-known for flavoring medications and custom-making medications to fit
    a child’s needs.

    How do you cater to children and
    families? How is the experience at Cherry’s different for kids than at generic
    pharmacy?

    We really don’t
    want to compete with chain stores. We have a different service, the overall
    atmosphere is welcoming, especially for a kid. We have a Thomas the Tank table
    and an electric train going around the ceiling. The first impression is very
    friendly, warm, and welcoming; the staff is extremely knowledgeable and we try
    to put ourselves in the places of the parents and the patients. We’re always
    available in person or over the phone and the phones are always picked up, you’re
    never shifted from prompt to prompt. Also, 80% of our business is deliveries
    throughout
    Manhattan, and shipping everywhere makes us more
    accessible. People, especially parents, crave information and access, and
    that’s what we try to provide at all times.

    What is your favorite part of working and
    owning Cherry’s?

    I’m passionate
    about what I do and I always loved working with children. My favorite part is
    being the owner of Cherry’s, especially in terms of creativity—I’m always
    coming up with new ideas for customer experience. I also enjoy just coming in to
    work and helping people. You really have to live the philosophy; Cherry’s
    Pharmacy is my second home.

    As the fall season approaches, a lot of
    families are concerned about keeping their kids safe and protected from the
    flu. What tips would you give to parents to help promote healthy flu prevention
    habits in youngsters?

    Always clean and
    wash your hands, soap and water works just as well as a bottle of Purell. When
    a child is at school, explain to them that you don’t share things like water
    bottles or each other’s lunches. Parents should also be able to teach their
    children the proper way to cover their mouths when they cough. Also, the flu
    season is November to March, so instead of being overwhelmed in the heart of
    the season, vaccinate your child early. Those are really basic things that can
    go a long way.

    Are there any products or
    over-the-counter medications you recommend in particular? What is your go-to
    recommendation to combat the flu?

    There’s really
    no one product; the flu is a virus. However, the thing that comes to mind is
    good hygiene, washing your hands, or pocket-sized Purell. One other product
    that’s good for older kids is a medication in the form of pellets called
    oscilloccinum; it’s really for flu-like symptoms; body aches, chill, and fever.
    Tamiflu is a treatment, not a preventative, but it’s always good to have
    ibuprofen or Tylenol on had for fever-like symptoms.

    Are there any homeopathic remedies or
    defenses do you recommend for flu prevention?

    Oscilloccinum is
    one of the most common homeopathic flu preventatives.

    Since we live in the city and often
    commute to work or school, can you provide some tips on how to prevent catching
    the flu while riding public transportation?

    I would say be
    careful when someone coughs or sneezes next to you; it’s tough when you’re
    traveling, so try to keep hand sanitizer in your purse, diaper bag or
    backpack. There’s no ideal way to prevent the flu, but proper hygiene such as
    washing your hands or using hand sanitizer asap is the best policy.

    In addition to choosing their own
    medicine flavors, are there any other ways you encourage children to take an
    active role in their health at Cherry’s Pharmacy?

    Selecting their
    flavor allows them to be a part of the decision-making process and is also a
    big part of having them take and respond positively to their medications. Also,
    depending on if they are old enough to understand our directions, we speak to
    both the children and parents directly so they can understand why they are
    taking their medications as well as how to take them. It’s very important to
    empower kids with that knowledge; it makes them compliant rather than having to
    force them to take their medicine.

    In your experience, what are some of the
    biggest mistakes parents make when their child is sick?

    The first
    mistake parents make is panicking, and of course the child senses that. Parents
    should tap into resources such as pharmacists to answer questions about
    medication and their side effects; lack of knowledge tends to create panic.
    Sometimes we encourage parents to bring them to Cherry’s and once here, we give
    the first dose and it goes over very well.

    Cherry’s Pharmacy, 207 East 66th Street, 212-717-7797, cherryspharmacy.com.