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Doctors We Love

Edited by Lauren Vespoli

We know nothing is more important to parents than the health and well-being of your children. When looking for a doctor for your child, you want someone who not only delivers the highest-caliber medical care, but who also makes your child (and you) feel comfortable and confident. That’s why we’ve partnered with Castle Connolly for another year to highlight the best doctors for families in the city. This annual guide is an excellent resource for anyone looking for a new pediatrician or pediatric specialist.AA042254

But there’s more than just listings—we also asked some of these top docs to answer your burning children’s health questions. Their tips and advice on everything from ear infections to ADHD medication to the HPV vaccine are sprinkled throughout the following pages. We hope these answers can help your family stay healthy, safe, and happy.

Does my baby need to wear a helmet?

A: “The most common alteration in an infant’s head shape is a flattening of the occiput (the back of the head) which often extends to one side of the head, and is termed plagiocephaly. This has become a more common problem following the ‘back to sleep’ campaign launched by the National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) in the mid-90s to encourage parents to place their children on their backs when they go to sleep. This public health effort halved the incidence of SIDS, but increased the incidence of ‘flat heads.’ To enable rapid brain growth, an infant’s skull bones do not fuse until the second year of life. However, the increased pressure on the back of an infant’s head which results from sleeping on the back can mold the bones to flatten the back and the side of the skull that the infant prefers to sleep on. This condition will resolve spontaneously and does not require a remolding orthosis (a ‘baby helmet’) or any other intervention.

There are much rarer forms of misshapen heads evident during infancy called cranial synostosis, which results from a premature fusion of some of the bones of the skull. In those cases, the skull can be long and narrow, or short and wide, or can assume other distorted shapes. These very uncommon cases, which can sometimes be genetic in origin, do require the attention of a physician, and on occasion require neurosurgical intervention. Again, baby helmets are not an effective form of intervention. The easiest way to distinguish these more significant conditions is for the physician to look at the head from above: Flat heads have a diagonal asymmetry (i.e., the two sides of the skull are not parallel), whereas the misshapen head resulting from craniosynostoses appears more symmetric from above, though in some cases it can be triangular in appearance.

In summary, infant [head] shaping helmets have not been shown to be helpful, and in fact can have negative side effects including skin irritation. Medical attention is required when a parent is concerned that their child’s head is significantly misshapen, not just flat in the back extending to one side.”

–Barry Kosofsky, MD

Komansky Center for Children’s Health of NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center

Pediatric Neurology

My child is too young to be sexually active—should he/she be vaccinated for HPV?

“Ideally, vaccinating against HPV should start before someone is sexually active. The HPV vaccine is indicated for girls and boys 11-26 years of age. You want to vaccinate before the exposure to HPV in order to have the best protection. Because most children are still seeing their pediatricians annually at that time for sports physicals, working papers, etc., it’s the ideal time to start the vaccination program because it requires a series of three injections. Finally, sexual health is part of most middle school health curriculums. The kids are hearing about it and thus it is another time period when you can engage youth in a discussion about their health and health prevention.”

–Natalie M. Neu, MD

Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center

Pediatric Infectious Disease

My child has just contracted Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease—how should I treat it?

“Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease is a common summertime illness caused by viruses in the Coxsackie family. The virus spreads on the hands or in the saliva or feces of an infected individual. Youngsters, who often lack good hygiene and tend to put everything—including objects previously in the mouth of another child—into their mouths, are sure to have a Coxsackie virus infection at least once or twice (with different strains) a summer. Often, the illness is just a high fever for 3-4 days with a sore throat and some generalized aches. But with certain strains of the virus, there is also a characteristic rash. Small pimples or pimple-blisters appear on hands and feet and in the mouth (on the tongue or the back of the soft palate, near the tonsils). The rash can also appear in other places (buttocks and almost anywhere else), but the distinctive feature is its location on hands, feet and in the mouth. Except in infants under 3 months of age (for whom we are more suspicious of fevers of any sort), an infection with a Coxsackie virus with or without rash is generally not severe. Your child may be less energetic and crankier due to the aches, sore throat, and fever; however, giving acetaminophen or ibuprofen usually results in a big improvement. Encouraging fluids is important since it will hurt your child to swallow and he/she may be hesitant to do so. Antibiotics have no effect on Coxsackie or related viruses. Typically the fever is gone in 3-4 days (but can be present longer in some cases), and the child is back to normal. The rash gradually disappears over several days. Except in rare cases, Hand, Foot, and Mouth/Coxackie virus infection is unpleasant but not serious, and with your love and attentions (fluids, acetaminophen or ibuprofen, hugs, etc.), your child will soon recover.”

–Harold S. Raucher, MD

Mount Sinai Hospital

Pediatrics

What kind of progress can I expect for my autistic child in behavioral therapy?

“This question is one that every parent should ask, not just about children who suffer with developmental disorders, but from any mental health problem. And, not just in reaction to starting psychotherapy, but also when the child is to be prescribed medications. It is critical that parents are informed about what is expected with regards to the course of treatment, what is involved in the delivery of treatment, and how progress will be measured along the way. Also, parents need to know what types of problems may occur, and how they will be managed. A very specific form of behavior therapy, called ‘Applied Behavior Analysis,’ or ‘ABA,’ is the most well-established psychological treatment for this disorder, and it gives the child the best chance of making gains and achieving his or her highest level of functioning.

But, ABA is not without drawbacks. ABA is a rigorous and intensive treatment that requires families to follow a plan for using reinforcement to shape the child’s behavior to an adaptive and positive level, while ignoring or removing attention (a form of reinforcement) is also used to decrease disruptive or unhelpful behavior. Based on the premise that all behavior is affected by the environment, and that a consistent and reinforcing environment can help a child to learn appropriate behavior and ‘unlearn’ disruptive behavior, ABA is used in the home, at school, and in just about any social context involving the child. Family members… from parents to siblings to grandparents to teachers… are taught key skills that assist the child in learning adaptive behavior across settings. ABA is usually a one-on-one treatment that has been proven via decades of research to make a significant and lasting difference in the life of individuals with autism. Families must be on the same page with the goals and procedures of ABA, and make a commitment to follow the program faithfully for progress to be made. The drawbacks of ABA center around its limited availability in some areas where there isn’t a trained ABA therapist, the cost of the therapy, and also progress may depend on the severity of the child’s disability, and the ability of the family to commit to the program.”

–Moira Rynn, MD

NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University
Medical Center

Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 

Is there anything I can do to prevent my child from developing food allergies?

“While food allergies are on the rise, especially peanut allergies, many parents are concerned about preventing food allergy. At this time, there are no proven strategies to prevent food allergy. Prior attempts at delaying introduction of the highly allergenic foods, such as peanuts, into the diet of susceptible children were not effective. In 2013, based on the available evidence, the AAP experts issued the updated guidelines for feeding infants at risk, defined as having at least one parent or a sibling with any allergic condition. Breastfeeding is recommended during the first 6 months of life. If breastfeeding is not possible, a hypoallergenic formula should be used during that time. Beyond 6 months, there is no benefit to using hypoallergenic formulas over cow milk or soy-based formulas for prevention of food allergy. Solid foods should be introduced starting between 4-6 months of age, and advanced as tolerated. In general, diet should be well balanced and healthy. In case the child develops an allergic reaction to the solid food introduction, subsequent foods should be advanced based on the physician’s recommendation. There are no specific recommendations for altering the diet of the pregnant women—in general, the pre-pregnancy diet should be continued in regards to the intake of nuts or other food allergens.”

–Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, MD

Mount Sinai Hospital

Pediatric Allergy & Immunology

Many ADHD medications seem to be overprescribed—how do I know if my child should go on medication for ADHD?

“I recognize this question well, and I share the concern it expresses. At the same time, it’s important to acknowledge that ADHD is a true behavioral disorder characterized by severe inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that leads to enormous disability. Although there are some children who mistakenly receive a diagnosis of ADHD because of an overly-eager parent, teacher, or physician, a far greater problem is the under-diagnosis and inadequate treatment of ADHD, which leads to major increases in motor vehicle accidents, school dropout, employment problems, alcohol and substance abuse, and sexual-reproductive risks among those affected.

Because many other disorders share some of the symptoms of ADHD (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea, anxiety and mood disorders, learning disorders, etc.), it is important to have a thorough evaluation with a trained practitioner who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Any child and adolescent psychiatrist can fully evaluate and treat ADHD, as well as some child neurologists, pediatricians, and psychologists. Parents should ask their family doctor for a referral to a specialist if they are concerned about a possible diagnosis of ADHD, and get all of their questions answered before they begin any treatment. The best treatment plans for ADHD will always include not only medication, but also behavioral interventions at home, in the classroom, and anywhere else the child is struggling, such as on the ball field, at religious school, and during music lessons.”

–Jess Shatkin, MD

NYU Langone Medical Center

Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

Why is my child getting ear infections? At what point should I consider ear tubes?

“The space behind the eardrum is called the middle ear, and it’s an air-filled space that’s ventilated and drained by the Eustachian tube. That tube doesn’t always work very well in kids, especially little ones, because of a number of factors—such as floppy cartilage in the tube wall and weak muscles that open it—so many kids have a relatively poorly ventilated middle ear. This poor ventilation can cause one of two problems:  pus behind the eardrum (a middle ear infection), or fluid behind the eardrum that’s not infected.

Ear infections are sometimes treated with antibiotics, and most kids grow out of these frequent infections by age 2 or 3. Another option for children who either have very frequent ear infections (more than six in a year) or fluid in both ears that lasts a long time (more than 2-3 months) is a small operation called ear tubes. This involves putting tiny plastic or rubber tubes through the eardrum, to take the place of the Eustachian tube and temporarily ventilate the ear while waiting for things to improve. It’s important to remember that the tubes do not fix the problem of immature Eustachian tube function and poor ear ventilation—nothing can fix this except growth and development.

There are two types of tubes: Short-acting and long-acting. Most children get the short-acting tubes, which fall out of the eardrum within four months to a year. Long-acting tubes are used with children suspected of having severe, long-term Eustachian tube problems: children with cleft palate, Down syndrome, various head and neck syndromes, or older children who have had longstanding ear problems and collapse of the eardrum. While the long-acting tubes make replacement surgery less likely, they also have a greater chance of leaving a persistent hole in the eardrum after they fall out or are removed, which would then require more surgery to repair. The decision about which tube to place is a tradeoff, and is made based on the details of the individual child’s case.

Finally, it is important to realize that not every ear infection needs to be treated with antibiotics. The American Academy of Pediatrics now says if the child is over 6 months old and is not having severe symptoms with the infection, an option is to treat the pain with Tylenol and Motrin and monitor the ear for improvement.”

–Michael Rothschild, MD

Mount Sinai Hospital

Pediatric Otolaryngology

 

THE DOCTORS

 

CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

Arthur R. Abright
Elmhurst Hospital Center
140 East 40th Street, 212-867-3131
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD, Anxiety Disorders)

 

Abraham Bartell
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 646-888-0060
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychiatry in Cancer, Psychiatry in Physical Illness)

 

Ina Becker
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
262 Central Park West, 917-441-0880
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety Disorders, Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD)

 

Roy J. Boorady
445 Park Avenue at 56th Street, 646-625-4294
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
(Psychopharmacology, Anxiety & Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD)

 

Lynn Burkes
NYU Langone Medical Center
185 West End Avenue, 212-362-5920
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Diagnostic Problems, ADD/ADHD, Divorce/Family Issues, Developmental Disorders)

 

Barbara J. Coffey
Mount Sinai Hospital
1240 Park Avenue, 212-659-1663
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Tourette’s Syndrome, ADD/ADHD, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Psychopharmacology)

 

Sara J. Fox
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
210 West 89th Street, 212-874-4558
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Eating Disorders, Psychoanalysis)

 

Vilma Gabbay
Mount Sinai Hospital
1240 Park Avenue, 212-659-1661
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Depression, Mood Disorders, Tourette’s Syndrome)

 

Dorothy Grice
Mount Sinai Hospital
1240 Park Avenue, 212-659-1670
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Tourette’s Syndrome, Autism)

 

Jennifer Havens
Bellevue Hospital Center
1 Park Avenue, 646-754-4944
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Bereavement/Traumatic Grief)

 

Glenn S. Hirsch
NYU Langone Medical Center
1 Park Avenue, 646-754-5100
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Tourette’s Syndrome, Bipolar/Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD)

 

Harold S. Koplewicz
445 Park Avenue at 56th Street, 646-625-4330
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Psychopharmacology, ADD/ADHD)

 

Leo L. Kron
Mount Sinai Roosevelt
30 East 76th Street, 212-861-7001
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychopharmacology, Psychotherapy)

 

Owen W. Lewis
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
11 East 87th Street, 212-543-5583
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychotherapy, Psychopharmacology)

 

Karen Ron-Li Liaw
NYU Langone Medical Center
1 Park Avenue, 646-754-4877
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (ADD/ADHD, Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Bereavement/Traumatic Grief)

 

Donna L. Moreau
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
110 East End Avenue, 212-772-9205
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychotherapy & Psychopharmacology, Anxiety & Mood Disorders)

 

Jeffrey H. Newcorn
Mount Sinai Hospital
1425 Madison Avenue, 212-659-8705
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychopharmacology, ADD/ADHD, Developmental Disorders, Behavioral Disorders)

 

Richard Perry
Bellevue Hospital Center
55 West 74th Street, 212-595-0116
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Pervasive Development Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Psychopharmacology)

 

Alan J. Ravitz
577 1st Avenue, 212-263-6567
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychopharmacology, Anxiety Disorders)

 

Moira A. Rynn
New York-Presbyterian/ Columbia University Medical Center
1051 Riverside Drive, 212-543-4506
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety Disorders, Mood Disorders, Clinical Trials)

 

Jess P. Shatkin
NYU Langone Medical Center
1 Park Avenue, 646-754-4900
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Behavioral Disorders, Anxiety & Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD, Autism)

 

Elizabeth Kay Spencer
NYU Langone Medical Center
121 East 31st Street, 212-684-3810
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

 

Stanley K. Turecki
Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center
136 East 64th Street, 212-355-2535
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Temperamentally Difficult Child, ADD/ADHD, Parenting Issues, Anxiety & Mood Disorders)

 

John T. Walkup
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-1891
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety Disorders)

 

Peter Walsh
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
115 Central Park West, 212-579-5552
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

 

CHILD NEUROLOGY

Cigdem I. Akman
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
180 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-305-6867
Child Neurology (Epilepsy)

 

Jeffrey C. Allen
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-9907
Child Neurology (Neuro-Oncology, Brain Tumors, Neurofibromatosis)

 

Alan M. Aron
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-831-4393
Child Neurology (Neurofibromatosis, Movement Disorders, Developmental Delay, Seizure Disorders)

 

Claudia A. Chiriboga-Klein
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
180 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-342-6867
Child Neurology (Developmental Disorders, Movement Disorders, Spasticity Management)

 

Darryl C. De Vivo

New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
710 West 168th Street, 212-305-5244
Child Neurology (Metabolic Disorders, Neuromuscular Disorders, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), Muscular Dystrophy)

 

Murray Engel
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 212-746-3278
Child Neurology (Neurophysiology, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, Epilepsy)

 

Robert H. Fryer
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
51 West 51st Street, 646-426-3876
Child Neurology (Concussion, Headache, Seizure Disorders, Autism & Developmental Disorders)

 

Ram Kairam
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
180 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-342-6863
Child Neurology (Autism, Behavioral Disorders)

 

David M. Kaufman
Mount Sinai Hospital
3 East 83rd Street, 212-737-4911
Child Neurology (Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders, Headache, Learning Disorders, Autism)

 

Yasmin Khakoo
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-8292
Child Neurology (Neuro-Oncology, Brain Tumors-Pediatric)

 

Barry E. Kosofsky
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 212-746-3321
Child Neurology (Developmental Disorders, Autism, Stroke)

 

Daniel K. Miles
NYU Langone Medical Center
223 East 34th Street, 646-558-0808
Child Neurology (Tuberous Sclerosis, Epilepsy)

 

Walter J. Molofsky
Mount Sinai Beth Israel
10 Union Square East, 212-844-6910
Child Neurology (Seizure Disorders, Headache, ADD/ADHD, Stroke)

 

Ruth D. Nass
NYU Langone Medical Center
1 Park Avenue, 646-754-4895
Child Neurology (Autism, ADD/ADHD, Learning Disorders, Migraine)

 

James J. Riviello, Jr.
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
180 Fort Washington Avenue, 646-426-3876
Child Neurology (Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders, Epilepsy in Tuberous Sclerosis, Electrical Status Epilepticus of Sleep)

 

Steven M. Wolf
Mount Sinai Beth Israel
10 Union Square East, 212-844-8888
Child Neurology (Epilepsy, Headache, Migraine)

 

PEDIATRIC ALLERGY
& IMMUNOLOGY

Paul M. Ehrlich
NYU Langone Medical Center
35 East 35th Street, 212-685-4225
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Asthma, Food Allergy)

 

Ronit Herzog
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 646-962-3410
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Asthma & Allergy, Sinusitis, Food Allergy)

 

Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-5548
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Food Allergy)

 

Hugh A. Sampson, Jr.
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-5548
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Food Allergy, Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma)

 

Scott H. Sicherer
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-5548
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Food Allergy, Drug Sensitivity, Eczema)

 

Julie Wang
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-5548
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Food Allergy, Anaphylaxis, Immunotherapy)

 

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY

Linda J. Addonizio
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3953 Broadway, 212-305-6575
Pediatric Cardiology (Transplant Medicine-Heart, Heart Failure, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy)

 

Karen Altmann
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-4320
Pediatric Cardiology (Congenital Heart Disease, Echocardiography)

 

Michael Argilla
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-5940
Pediatric Cardiology (Cardiac Catheterization, Critical Care, Congestive Heart Failure)

 

Rica G. Arnon
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 212-241-8662
Pediatric Cardiology (Congenital Heart Disease)

 

Morton D. Borg
Mount Sinai Beth Israel
10 Union Square East, 212-844-8313
Pediatric Cardiology (Fetal Echocardiography)

 

David H. Brick
NYU Langone Medical Center
154 West 14th Street, 212-604-7880
Pediatric Cardiology (Fetal Echocardiography, Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease, Complex Diagnosis)

 

Patrick A. Flynn
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-3561
Pediatric Cardiology (Congenital Heart Disease, Echocardiography, Kawasaki Disease, Marfan’s Syndrome)

 

Bruce D. Gelb
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 212-241-8662
Pediatric Cardiology (Noonan Syndrome, Marfan’s Syndrome)

 

Julie S. Glickstein
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-2359
Pediatric Cardiology (Fetal Echocardiography)

 

Usha Krishnan
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
3959 Broadway, 212-305-4436
Pediatric Cardiology (Pulmonary Hypertension)

 

Alan M. Langsner
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-5940
Pediatric Cardiology, (Fetal Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease-Adult & Child, Preventive Cardiology)

 

Barry A. Love
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 212-241-8662
Pediatric Cardiology (Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) Closure, Cardiac Catheterization, Interventional Cardiology, Atrial Septal Defect)

 

Matthew N. Martinez
NYU Langone Medical Center
154 West 14th Street, 212-604-7880
Pediatric Cardiology (Fetal Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease)

 

Ira A. Parness
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 212-241-8662
Pediatric Cardiology (Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease, Fetal Echocardiograp)

 

Salvatore Presti
NYU Langone Medical Center
110 East 59th Street, 212-838-9880
Pediatric Cardiology (Fetal Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease, Kawasaki Disease)

 

Howard S. Seiden
Mount Sinai Hospital
1 Gustave L. Levy Place, 212-241-8662
Pediatric Cardiology (Congenital Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Critical Care)

 

Robert J. Sommer
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
161 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-342-7060
Pediatric Cardiology (Congenital Heart Disease, Atrial Septal Defect, Cardiac Catheterization)

 

Thomas J. Starc
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-4432
Pediatric Cardiology (Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders)

 

Leonard G. Steinberg
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-3561
Pediatric Cardiology (Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease)

 

Laurel J. Steinherz
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-8103
Pediatric Cardiology (Cardiac Effects of Cancer/Cancer Therapy)

 

Julie A. Vincent
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-6069
Pediatric Cardiology (Interventional Cardiology, Congenital Heart Disease, Cardiac Catheterization)

 

PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE

Edward E. Conway, Jr.
Mount Sinai Beth Israel
350 East 17th Street, 212-844-1333
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (Neurologic Critical Care, Respiratory Failure, Head Injury)

 

Bruce M. Greenwald
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-3056
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (Respiratory Failure, Sepsis & Septic Shock, Asthma, Diabetes Ketoacidosis)

 

Mayer Sagy
NYU Langone Medical Center
550 1st Avenue, 212-263-6366
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

 

PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY

Ilene Fennoy
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-6559
Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth/Development Disorders, Diabetes, Klinefelter’s Syndrome, Obesity)

 

Bonita H. Franklin
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-5940
Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes, Growth Disorders, Thyroid Disorders)

 

Mary P. Gallagher
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
1150 Saint Nicholas Avenue, 212-851-5494
Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes)

 

Brenda Kohn
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-5940
Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth Disorders, Pituitary Disorders, Thyroid Disorders, Adrenal Disorders)

 

Maria I. New
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, Floor 10, 212-241-8210
Pediatric Endocrinology (Adrenal Disorders, Growth/Development Disorders)

 

Sharon E. Oberfield
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital Of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-6559
Pediatric Endocrinology (Adrenal Disorders, Neuroendocrine Disorders, Growth Disorders)

 

Robert C. Rapaport
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 212-241-6936
Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth Disorders, Thyroid Disorders, Diabetes)

 

Charles A. Sklar
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-8138
Pediatric Endocrinology (Anemia, Cancer, Growth Disorders, Obesity, Pituitary Diseases)

 

Ileana Vargas-Rodriguez
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
1150 Street, Saint Nicholas Avenue, 212-851-5494
Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes, Obesity)

 

Maria G. Vogiatzi
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 212-746-3462
Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth Disorders, Pubertal Disorders, Adrenal Disorders, Bone Disorders, Obesity, Diabetes)

 

Elizabeth Wallach
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 212-241-6936
Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth Disorders, Hypothyroidism, Diabetes)

 

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

Babu S. Bangaru
NYU Langone Medical Center
530 1st Avenue, 212-263-7868
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Ulcerative Colitis/Crohn’s, Liver Disease, Nutrition, Endoscopy)

 

Keith J. Benkov
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-5415
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Celiac Disease, Crohn’s Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Ulcerative Colitis)

 

Mirna A. Chehade
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-4880
Pediatric Gastroenterology & Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Entercolitis Syndrome, Food Allergy, Esophageal Disorders)

 

Philip G. Kazlow
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-5903
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Celiac Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Liver Disease, Parasitic Infection, Pancreatic Disorders)

 

Joel E. Lavine
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
3959 Broadway, 212-305-5903
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Liver Disease, Pancreatic Disease, Celiac Disease, Bowel Disorders)

 

Jeremiah J. Levine
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-5407
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn’s Disease, Liver Disease)

 

Joseph Levy
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-5407
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Celiac Disease, Gastroparesis, Gastroscopy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome)

 

Steven Lobritto
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-3000
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Hepatitis, Liver Disease, Liver Transplantation, Biliary Tract Diseases, Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage)

 

Ali A. Mencin
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-5903
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Endoscopy, Liver Disease, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Constipation)

 

Robbyn E. Sockolow
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 646-962-3869
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Celiac Disease, Crohn’s Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Capsule Endoscopy)

 

William Spivak
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
177 East 87th Street, 212-369-7700
Pediatric Gastroenterology (Acid Reflux Disease, Crohn Disease, Ulcerative Colitis)

 

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY-
ONCOLOGY

Alexander Aledo
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-3400
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Leukemia & Lymphoma, Bone Tumors, Neutropenia, Retinoblastoma, Sarcoma)

 

Francine Blei
Mount Sinai Roosevelt
1000 10th Avenue, 212-523-8931
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Vascular Malformations, Hemangiomas, Lymphedema, Port Wine Stain)

 

James B. Bussel
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-3400
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Anemia, Autoimmune Disease, Blood Coagulation Disorders, Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Neutropenia)

 

William L. Carroll
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-8400
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Leukemia & Lymphoma, Hematologic Malignancies, Stem Cell Transplant, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s, Transplant Infections, Bone Marrow Transplantation)

 

Nai-Kong V. Cheung
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 646-888-2313
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Neuroblastoma, Pediatric Cancers, Clinical Trials, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Chemotherapy, Epidemiology, Immune System Disorders, Immunotherapy)

 

Ira J. Dunkel
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-2153
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Bone Marrow Transplantation, Brain Cancer, Pediatric Cancers, Central Nervous System Cancer, Germinoma, Retinoblastoma)

 

Sharon L. Gardner
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-8250
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Bone Marrow Transplantation, Brain Cancer, Chemotherapy, Leukemia, Lymphoma, Neuroblastema, Stem Cell Transplant)

 

James H. Garvin, Jr.
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
161 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-305-5808
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Neuro-Oncology, Chemotherapy, Anemia, Bone Marrow Transplant, Leukemia, Pediatric Brain Tumors)

 

Patricia Giardina
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-3400
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Hemoglobinopathy, Sickle Cell Anemia, Thalassemia, Hemochromatosis, Hemophilia, Von Willebrand’s Disease)

 

Julia Glade Bender
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
161 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-305-9770
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Sarcoma, Neuroblastoma, Wilms’ Tumor)

 

Linda Granowetter
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-9660
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Bone Cancers, Lymphoma, Sarcoma, Childhood Cancer, Leukemia)

 

Nancy A. Kernan
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-7250
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Oncology, Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation, Congenital and Acquired Disease of Hematopoiesis and Immunity)

 

Kim Kramer
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-6410
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Pediatric Oncology, Neuroblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Neuroectodermal Tumors, Immunotherapy)

 

Brian H. Kushner
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-6793
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Pediatric Oncology, Neuroblastoma, Neuroectodermal Tumors, Immunotherapy, Autologus, Bone Marrow Transplantation)

 

Judith R. Marcus
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
161 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-305-5808
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Leukemia, Lymphoma, Pediatric Oncology, Neuroblastoma, Epstein Barr Virus, Anemia, Thalassemia, Platelet Disorders, Bone Tumors, Chemotherapy, Sickle Cell Anemia)

 

Paul A. Meyers
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-5952
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Pediatric Oncology, Sarcoma, Leukemia, Soft Tissue Developmental Tumors of Childhood)

 

Shakeel Modak
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-7623
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Neuroblastoma, Immunotherapy, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology)

 

Richard O’Reilly
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-5957
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Pediatric Oncology, Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation, Congenital and Acquired Diseases of Hematopoiesis and Immunity)

 

Susan E. Prockop
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-6715
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Bone Marrow & Stem Cell Transplant, Leukemia)

 

Sujit Sheth
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-3400
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Sickle Cell Disease, Hemophilia, Thalassemia, Anemia-Iron Deficiency)

 

Peter G. Steinherz
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-7951
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Pediatric Oncology, Leukemia, Lymphomas, Wilms’ Tumor, Developmental Chemotherapy)

 

Tanya M. Trippett
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-8267
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Lymphomas, Pediatric Oncology, New Investigational Agents, Drug Resistance)

 

Michael A. Weiner
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
161 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-305-5808
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Lymphomas, Leukemia, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Chemotherapy)

 

Leonard Wexler
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-7990
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Pediatric Oncology, Sarcomas, Anthracycline Cardiotoxicity/Cardioprotection, Supportive Care)

 

Birte Wistinghausen
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 212-241-7022
Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Sarcomas, Leukemia, Pediatric Brain Tumors, Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease, Wilms’ Tumor)

 

PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE

William Borkowsky
NYU Langone Medical Center
550 1st Avenue, 212-263-5680
Pediatric Infectious Disease (Pediatric HIV/AIDS)

 

Marc D. Foca
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
630 West 168th Street, 212-305-5000
Pediatric Infectious Disease (Tuberculosis, HIV)

 

Anne A. Gershon
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway Street, 212-305-9445
Pediatric Infectious Disease (HIV, Vaccines, Varicella-Zoster Virus Infections and Vaccines)

 

John G. Larsen
Mount Sinai Hospital
1245 Park Avenue, 212-427-0540
Pediatric Infectious Disease (AIDS/HIV, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Travel Medicine, Bone and Joint Infections, Bone and Soft Tissue Abnormalities)

 

Natalie M. Neu
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian/ Columbia University Medical Center
630 West 168th Street, 212-305-0635
Pediatric Infectious Disease (AIDS/HIV, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Travel Medicine, Bone and Joint Infections, Bone and Soft Tissue Abnormalities)

 

Roberto Posada
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-6930
Pediatric Infectious Disease (AIDS/HIV, Lyme Disease, Immune Deficiency, Tuberculosis, Infections, Meningitis, Endocarditis)

 

Alice S. Prince
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
650 West 168th Street, 212-305-4558
Pediatric Infectious Disease (Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Infection)

 

Lisa R. Saiman
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-4558
Pediatric Infectious Disease (Cystic Fibrosis, Hospital Epidemiology, Multidrug-resistant Organisms)

 

PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY

Corinne Benchimol
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-6187
Pediatric Nephrology (Glomerulonephritis, Hematuria, Hydronephrosis, Kidney Disease, Nephrotic Syndrome, Proteinuria)

 

Hilary Hotchkiss
Mount Sinai Hospital
1468 Madison Avenue, 866-674-3721
Pediatric Nephrology (Glomerulonephritis, Hypertension in Children, Kidney Disease-Chronic, Transplant Medicine-Kidney)

 

Valerie L. Johnson
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 646-962-4324
Pediatric Nephrology (Nephrotic Syndrome, Glomerulonephritis, Renal and Kidney Transplant, Dialysis, Hypertension, Kidney Stones, Hematuria, Proteinuria)

 

Fangming Lin
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
630 West 168th Street, 212-305-5825
Pediatric Nephrology (Hypertension, Kidney Stones, Nephrotic Syndrome, Glomerulonephritis, Kidney Transplantation, Hematuria, Proteinuria)

 

Eduardo M. Perelstein
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 646-962-4324
Pediatric Nephrology (Glomerular Diseases and Nephrotic Syndrome, Hypertension, Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Glomerulonephritis, Kidney Disease, Disorder of Electrolytes)

 

Jeffrey M. Saland
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-6187
Pediatric Nephrology (Kidney Transplant, Acute Renal Failure, Dialysis, Glomerulonephritis, Hydronephrosis, Nephrotic Syndrome, Urinary Tract Infection)

 

Howard Trachtman
NYU Langone Medical Center
160 East 32nd Street, 212-263-5940
Pediatric Nephrology (Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome, High Blood Pressure, Kidney Failure, Nephrotic Syndrome, Water-Electrolyte Imbalance)

 

PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Max M. April
NYU Langone Medical Center
240 East 38th Street, 646-501-7890
Pediatric Otolaryngology (Adenoidectomy, Sleep Apnea, Sinus Disease, Ear Disorders, Nasal Disorders, Layrngeal Diseases, Otolaryngology)

 

Jay N. Dolitsky
New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai
261 5th Avenue, 212-679-3499
Pediatric Otolaryngology (Ear Infection, Sleep Disorders, Choanal Atresia)

 

Eli Grunstein
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-8933
Pediatric Otolaryngology (Spinal Cord Injury, Voice and Vocal Cord Injury, Chronic Ear Infection, Speech Disorder, Hearing Los, Cochlear Implantation, Sinus Infection, Tonsillectomy, Cleft Lip/Palate Surgery)

 

Joseph Haddad, Jr.
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-8933
Pediatric Otolaryngology (Pediatric Otolaryngology, Voice and Vocal Cord Surgery, Tonsil and Adenoid Problems, Cholesteatoma, Sinus Infection, Throat and Voice Problems, Tonsillectomy, Cleft Palate/Cleft Lip, Airway Disorder)

 

Vikash K. Modi
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
428 East 72nd Street, 646-962-2224
Pediatric Otolaryngology (Airway Reconstruction, Sleep Disorders, Thyroid Disorders, Pediatric neck Mass, Ear Infections, Sinusitis, Throat and Voice Problems, Cleft Lip/Palate, Tonsillectomy)

 

Michael Rothschild
Mount Sinai Hospital
1175 Park Avenue, 212-996-2995
Pediatric Otolaryngology (Adenoidectomy, Ear Infection, Myringotomy, Nosebleeds, Otitis Externa, Sinusitis, Sleep Apnea, Tonsillectomy)

 

Robert F. Ward
NYU Langone Medical Center
240 East 38th Street, 646-501-7890
Pediatric Otolaryngology (Airway Obstruction, Choanal Atresia, Sino-Nasal Disorders, Sinus Infection, Sleep Disorders, Thyroid Diseases)

 

PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY

Andrei E. Constantinescu
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-5122
Pediatric Pulmonology (Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Failure, Asthma, Pulmonary Diseases, Neuromuscular Disease, Ventilation Dependency, Transplant Pulmonology)

 

Mary Dimaio
New York-Presbyterian/ Weill Cornell Medical Center
1440 York Avenue, 212-988-5008
Pediatric Pulmonology (Cystic Fibrosis, Asthma)

 

Meyer Kattan
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian/Columbia
3959 Broadway, 212-305-5122
Pediatric Pulmonology (Asthma, Lung Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Pulmonary Diseases, Sleep Apnea)

 

Carin I. Lamm
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-5122
Pediatric Pulmonology (Pulmonary Diseases, Astham, Sleep Disorders, Sleep Anea, Narcolepsy, Sleep Walking, Night Terrors, Asthma, Insomnia, Restless Leg Syndrome)

 

Gerald M. Loughlin
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 646-962-3410
Pediatric Pulmonology (Respiratory Disease, Asthma, Sleep Apnea, Bronchoscopy, Chronic Lung Disease, Sleep Disorder, Gastroesophageal Reflux)

 

Lynne M. Quittell
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
622 West 168th Street, 212-305-5122
Pediatric Pulmonology (Asthma, Pulmonology, Pulmonary Medicine, Cystic Fibrosis, Pulmonary Diseases)

 

Andrew Ting
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-7788
Pediatric Pulmonology (Asthma, Cystic Fibrosis, Bronchoscopy, Cough, Pneumonia, Tuberculosis, Sleep-Disordered Breathing, Wheeze)

 

Alfin Vicencio
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-7788
Pediatric Pulmonology (Asthma, Bronchoscopy, Cystic Fibrosis, Bronchiectasis, Cough, Pneumonia, Pneumothorax, Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia)

 

PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY

Alexa B. Adams
Hospital for Special Surgery
535 East 70th Street, 212-774-2083
Pediatric Rheumatology (Juvenile Arthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Vasculitis)

 

Andrew H. Eichenfield
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian/Columbia
3959 Broadway, 212-305-9304
Pediatric Rheumatology (Juvenile Arthritis, Lyme Disease, Lupus/SLE, Rheumatic Diseases)

 

Lisa F. Imundo
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian/Columbia
161 Fort Washington Avenue, 212-305-4308
Pediatric Rheumatology (Pediatric Rheumatology, Lupus, Scleroderma, Arthritis, Lyme Disease, Kawasaki Disease)

 

Herbert M. Lazarus
NYU Langone Medical Center
390 West End Avenue, 212-787-1444
Pediatric Rheumatology (Lyme Disease, Pediatric Rheumatology, Lupus, General Pediatrics)

 

Thomas Lehman
Hospital for Special Surgery
535 East 70th Street, 212-606-1151
Pediatric Rheumatology (Childhood Systematic Lupus Erythematosus, Childhood Scleroderma, Vasculitic Diseases of Childhood)

 

PEDIATRIC SURGERY

Lawrence E. Bodenstein
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-342-8586
Pediatric Surgery (Neonatal Surgery, Tumor Surgery)

 

Arthur Cooper
Harlem Hospital Center
506 Lenox Avenue, 212-939-4003
Pediatric Surgery (Endoscopy, Trauma, Disaster Preparedness, Child Abuse)

 

Howard B. Ginsburg
NYU Langone Medical Center
530 1st Avenue, 212-263-7391
Pediatric Surgery (Neonatal Surgery, Tumor Surgery, Pediatric Urology, Gastrointestinal Surgery)

 

Michael La Quaglia
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
1275 York Avenue, 212-639-7002
Pediatric Surgery (Cancer Surgery, Neuroblastoma, Liver Cancer, Wilms’ Tumor)

 

William Middlesworth
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-342-8586
Pediatric Surgery (Neonatal Surgery)

 

Peter Midulla
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-1608
Pediatric Surgery (Hernia, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Neonatal Surgery)

 

Jan M. Quaegebeur
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-5975
Pediatric Surgery (Arterial Switch, Heart Valve Surgery, Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Congenital Heart Surgery)

 

Nitsana A. Spigland
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
520 East 70th Street, 212-746-5648
Pediatric Surgery (Pediatric Cancers, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Pediatric Thoracic Surgery, Neonatal Surgery)

 

Steven Stylianos
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-342-8586
Pediatric Surgery (Trauma, Neonatal Surgery, Chest Wall Deformities, Congenital Anomalies)

 

Sandra Tomita
NYU Langone Medical Center
530 1st Avenue, 212-263-7391
Pediatric Surgery

 

Francisca T. Velcek
Lenox Hill Hospital
965 5th Avenue, 212-744-9396
Pediatric Surgery (Anorectal Malformations, Pediatric Gynecology, Neonatal Surgery, Hernia)

 

PEDIATRIC UROLOGY

Pasquale Casale
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
3959 Broadway, 212-305-9918
Pediatric Urology (Genitourinary Reconstruction, Minimally Invasive Surgery-Pediatric, Genital Reconstruction-Pediatric, Robotic Surgery-Pediatric)

 

Grace S. Hyun
Mount Sinai Hospital
5 East 98th Street, 212-241-4812
Pediatric Urology (Hypospadias, Varicocele, Undescended Testis, Minimally Invasive Surgery)

 

Dix P. Poppas
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 212-746-5337
Pediatric Urology (Genital Reconstruction-Pediatric, Robotic Surgery-Pediatric, Minimally Invasive Surgery-Pediatric)

 

Richard N. Schlussel
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
65 East 96th Street, 212-987-9500
Pediatric Urology (Hypospadias, Robotic Surgery, Reconstructive Surgery, Pyeloplasty)

 

Ellen Shapiro
NYU Langone Medical Center
150 East 32nd Street, 646-825-6326
Pediatric Urology (Genitourinary Congenital Anomalies, Fetal Urology, Genital Reconstruction-Pediatric, Kidney and Bladder Surgery)

 

PEDIATRICS

Dennis Allendorf
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
401 West 118th Street, 212-666-4610
Pediatrics

 

Stephen Arpadi
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia
622 West 168th Street, 212-305-2384
Pediatrics (AIDS/HIV)

 

Felicia B. Axelrod
NYU Langone Medical Center
530 1st Avenue, 212-263-7225
Pediatrics (Dysautonomia)

 

Staci M. Bodner
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
125 East 72nd Street, 212-988-6500
Pediatrics

 

Bruce J. Brovender
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
1559 York Avenue, 212-585-3329
Pediatrics

 

Jocelyn Brown
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
922 West 168th Street, 212-305-2393
Pediatrics (Child Abuse)

 

Harris E. Burstin
NYU Langone Medical Center
317 East 34th Street, 212-725-6300
Pediatrics

 

Michel A. Cohen
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
46 Warren Street, 212-226-7666
Pediatrics (Child Development, Sleep Disorders)

 

Jennifer Cross
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 646-692-4303
Pediatrics (Learning Disorders, Child Development, Behavioral Disorders)

 

Gary S. Edelstein
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
125 East 72nd Street, 212-988-6500
Pediatrics

 

Genevieve E. Ferrier
NYU Langone Medical Center
46 West 11th Street, 212-529-4330
Pediatrics

 

Maura Frank
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
505 East 70th Street, 212-746-3303
Pediatrics (Obesity, Adolescent Medicine)

 

Stephanie B. Freilich
Mount Sinai Hospital
1125 Park Avenue, 212-289-1400
Pediatrics

 

Judith Goldstein
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
1559 York Avenue, 212-585-3329
Pediatrics (Infectious Disease)

 

Dyan S. Hes
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
67 Irving Place, 212-473-4200
Pediatrics (Obesity, Weight Management)

 

Carolyn B. Hiltebeitel
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
12 West 72nd Street, 646-962-7800
Pediatrics

 

Sharon H. Ho
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
125 East 72nd Street, 212-988-6500
Pediatrics

 

Sarla Inamdar
Metropolitan Hospital Center
1901 1st Avenue, 212-423-6228
Pediatrics (Rheumatology)

 

Max A. Kahn
NYU Langone Medical Center
390 West End Avenue, 212-787-1444
Pediatrics

 

Katherine Karlsrud
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
56 East 76th Street, 212-249-5544
Pediatrics (Adolescent Medicine)

 

Marie B. Keith
NYU Langone Medical Center
552 Broadway, 212-334-3366
Pediatrics

 

Shulamite Kon
Mount Sinai Hospital
240 West 98th Street, 212-662-1212
Pediatrics

 

Neal M. Kotin
Mount Sinai Hospital
1125 Park Avenue, 212-289-1400
Pediatrics (Asthma, Bronchitis, Sleep Disorders, Pulmonary Disease)

 

Signe S. Larson
Uptown Pediatrics
1245 Park Avenue, 212-427-0540
Pediatrics (Pediatric Endocrinology)

 

George M. Lazarus
Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian
106 East 78th Street, 212-744-0840
Pediatrics

 

Susan E. Levitzky
NYU Langone Medical Center
161 Madison Avenue, 212-213-1960
Pediatrics (Asthma, Child Development, Adoption and Foster Care)

 

Joseph C. Licata
Lenox Hill Hospital
1559 York Avenue, 212-585-3329
Pediatrics

 

Evelyn G. Lipper
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68th Street, 646-962-4303
Pediatrics (Learning Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Child Development)

 

Cecelia McCarton
McCarton Center for Developmental Pediatrics
350 East 82nd Street, 212-996-9019
Pediatrics (Developmental Pediatrics, Autism, Learning Disorders, ADD/ADHD, Developmental Disorders)

 

Margaret T. McHugh
Bellevue Hospital Center
462 1st Avenue, 212-562-6073
Pediatrics (Child Abuse, Adolescent Medicine)

 

Dodi D. Meyer
New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
575 West 181st Street, 212-342-3060
Pediatrics

 

Rosanna Mirante
Mount Sinai Hospital
55 East 87th Street, 212-722-0707
Pediatrics

 

Louis G. Monti
Mount Sinai Hospital
55 East 87th Street, 212-722-0707
Pediatrics (Infectious Disease)

 

Ramon Murphy
Uptown Pediatrics
1245 Park Avenue, 212-427-0540
Pediatrics (Adolescent Medicine)

 

Meryl Newman-Cedar
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
215 East 79th Street, 212-737-7800
Pediatrics (Child Development)

 

Kevin C. Oeffinger
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
300 East 66th Street, 646-888-4730
Pediatrics (Cancer Survivors- Late Effects of Therapy)

 

Jessica Orbe
Mount Sinai St. Luke’s
50 West 77th Street, 212-579-5001
Pediatrics

 

Palmo J. Pasquariello
Lenox Hill Hospital
1559 York Avenue, 212-585-3329
Pediatrics

 

Eric Sin-Kam Poon
Komansky Center for Children’s Health of New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
28 East Broadway Street, 212-941-8108
Pediatric (Pediatric Cardiology)

 

Laura Popper
Mount Sinai Hospital
116 East 66th Street, 212-794-2136
Pediatrics

 

Paula J. Prezioso
NYU Langone Medical Center
317 East 34th Street, 212-289-1400
Pediatrics (Adolescent Medicine, Eating Disorders)

 

Harold S. Raucher
Mount Sinai Hospital
1125 Park Avenue, 212-289-1400
Pediatrics (Infectious Disease, Travel Medicine)

 

Lori J. Rosello
NYU Langone Medical Center
46 West 11th Street, 212-529-4330
Pediatrics

 

Michael Rosenbaum
Komansky Center for Children’s Health of New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
450 West End Avenue, 212-769-3070
Pediatrics (Pediatric Endocrinology, Growth Disorder)

 

Suzanne Rosenfeld
Komansky Center for Children’s Health of New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
450 West End Avenue, 212-769-3070
Pediatrics (Adolescent Medicine)

 

Ira M. Sacker
NYU Langone Medical Center
19 W 34th Street, 212-268-4440
Pediatrics (Eating Disorders, Obesity)

 

Prantik Saha
Mount Sinai Roosevelt
2 West 86th Street, 212-787-1788
Pediatrics

 

Marie V. Sanford
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
12 West 72nd Street, 646-962-7800
Pediatrics

 

Philippe L. Similon
Lenox Hill Hospital
1111 Park Avenue, 212-534-3000
Pediatrics

 

Barney Softness
Komansky Center for Children’s Health of New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
450 West End Avenue, 212-769-3070
Pediatrics

 

Barry B. Stein
Mount Sinai Hospital
1125 Park Avenue, 212-289-1400
Pediatrics (Developmental and Behavioral Disorders)

 

Marla T. Stern
Mount Sinai Hospital
55 East 87th Street, 212-722-0707
Pediatrics

 

Jennifer Trachtenberg
Mount Sinai Hospital
1125 Park Avenue, 212-289-1400
Pediatrics (Parenting Issues, Weight Management)

 

Michael R. Traister
NYU Langone Medical Center
390 West End Avenue, 212-787-1444
Pediatrics (Adoption and Foster Care)

 

Max F. Van Gilder
Mount Sinai Roosevelt
2 West 86th Street, 212-787-1788
Pediatrics

 

Sylvain M. Weinberger
NYU Langone Medical Center
51 East 25th Street, 212-598-0331
Pediatrics (Prematurity, Low Birth Weight Infants)

 

Jona Weiss
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
114 East 72nd Street, 212-988-6060
Pediatrics (Adolescent Medicine)

 

Michael Yaker
Mount Sinai Hospital
620 Columbus Avenue, 212-874-4500
Pediatrics

 

Sol Zimmerman
NYU Langone Medical Center
317 East 34th Street, 212-725-6300
Pediatrics (Growth/Development Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Cough-Tie Syndrome)

 

ABOUT CASTLE CONNOLLY

Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is a healthcare research and information company founded in 1991 by a former medical college board chairman and president to help guide consumers to America’s top doctors and top hospitals. Castle Connolly’s established survey and research process, under the direction of an MD, involves tens of thousands of top doctors and the medical leadership of leading hospitals.

Castle Connolly’s physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select top doctors on both the national and regional levels. Its online nominations process—located at castleconnolly.com/nominations—is  open to all licensed physicians in America who are able to nominate physicians in any medical specialty and in any part of the country, as well as indicate whether the nominated physician is, in their opinion, among the best in their region in their medical specialty or among the best in the nation in their medical specialty. Careful screening of doctors’ educational and professional experience is essential before the final selection is made among those physicians most highly regarded by their peers. The result—Castle Connolly identifies the top doctors in America and provides you, the consumer, with detailed information about their education, training and special expertise in their paperback guides, national and regional magazine “Top Doctors” features, and online directories.

Doctors do not and cannot pay to be selected and profiled as Castle Connolly Top Doctors.

Physicians selected for inclusion in this magazine’s “Top Doctors” feature may also appear as Regional Top Doctors online at castleconnolly.com or in one of Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors guides, such as America’s Top Doctors or America’s Top Doctors for Cancer.