[27-Nov-2014 02:01:36 America/New_York] PHP Fatal error: Class 'WP_Widget' not found in /home/nyfam/public_html/wp-content/themes/manhattan-media-foundation/includes/widgets/mm.widget.background.image.php on line 19 [27-Nov-2014 02:52:12 America/New_York] PHP Fatal error: Class 'WP_Widget' not found in /home/nyfam/public_html/wp-content/themes/manhattan-media-foundation/includes/widgets/mm.widget.twitter.php on line 20 NYC's Top Pediatricians & Pediatric Specialists - New York Family Magazine
  • NYC’s Top Pediatricians & Pediatric Specialists

    An Annual Guide To Help You Find The Best Doctors For Your Kids

    By Jill Feigelman

    For obvious reasons, parents want to find a pediatrician with whom they have a great relationship. You want to always feel comfortable talking to your doctor, whether you’re calling about a sudden fever or just a regular check-up. To help in your search for finding one who is right for you, we’ve once again teamed up with consumer health research firm Castle Connolly to come up with our sixth annual guide to the top pediatricians and pediatric specialists in Manhattan.
    And to give you a better sense of what drives them, we’ve asked nine of these 162 doctors to share more about their lives and passions. We hope that these stories will both serve as a practical resource for your growing family and encourage an appreciation for the medical heroes who all agree that the best part about their jobs are the children—our children.

    Interviews have been edited for clarity.

    The Ache Breaker
    Dr. Sarla Inamdar
    Metropolitan Hospital Center, Chief Of Pediatrics
    Pediatric Rheumatologist

    Dr. Inamdar is constantly challenged in her work as a pediatric rheumatologist to find the underlying source behind the aches and pains in children’s joints. She initially went into this field because she was surprised by the lack of rheumatologists available to children with illnesses like chronic arthritis, lupus, and other musculoskeletal disorders. Spending most of her career in East Harlem, she focuses on providing the best patient-centered comprehensive care to children with these types of disorders.

    What do you consider to be the highlight of your career?
    Caring for children with chronic illnesses is what makes our work so satisfying and rewarding. It’s such a joy to see these children leading active lives and growing into mature, goal-oriented young adults. I’ve been fortunate to see patients of mine who go on to graduate high school, attend college, and pursue careers in education, nursing, journalism, and other fields.

    What about the challenges of your work?
    There are, of course, challenges to face when patients’ illnesses are progressive. But newer treatments, as well as the resilience and determination of children to get better, are reasons to offer the best care to children and their families.

    What do you love most about your job and what inspires you?
    Aches and pains especially in bones and joints don’t always indicate rheumatologic disorders, so I’m clinically and academically challenged to find an answer for a child’s problem. The problem-solving aspect of our profession is what makes our work so interesting and inspires us to keep in touch with the advances in this field.

    For more information, visit nyc.gov/html/hhc/mhc

    The Super Sleuth
    Dr. Thomas J.A. Lehman
    Hospital For Special Surgery, Chief Of Pediatric Rheumatology
    (Also NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center) 
    Pediatric Rheumatology

    Dr. Lehman is a bit of a detective. He takes pride in discovering something another doctor might have overlooked in order to find the cause behind a child’s ailment. Early in his career, patients would come to him when they had no one else to turn to. Now, he takes pride in seeing former patients grow into successful young adults.

    What do you do and why do you love your field?
    Early on in my training, I learned that pediatric rheumatologists take care of children with complex chronic problems that don’t belong to any other specialty—dealing with every organ system from the brain to the toes. And so, in my generation, we were trained to be both the “consult of last resort” and the specialists in “obscurology.” I find great joy in doing a careful and thorough examination and in recognizing a disease that others have not. Unlike many diseases that can be “proven” by a diagnostic test, proper diagnosis and care in pediatric rheumatology is dependent on experience and pattern recognition; you can’t simply read the book. Of course, there’s also great joy in taking care of children over a long period of time and watching them grow into successful young adults.

    What do you consider to be the highlight of your career?
    I’m inspired by the continued and steady progress in the care of children with rheumatic diseases. When I first started practicing in the 1970s, we made children’s lives better, but there was no sense that we could cure anyone—we spent much time in the rehabilitation center filled with patients in wheelchairs. Now, while we still can’t really use the word “cure” yet, we can bring the disease entirely under control for many of the children who were disabled in the past. The greatest joy in my work is that you could meet most of my patients today and not even realize from their appearance or lifestyle that they had a chronic illness. In fact, patients report that the medicine, which has finally become available after much testing, can make them feel like they don’t even have the disease anymore.

    For more information, visit hss.edu

    The Big Thinker
    Dr. Nai-Kong V. Cheung
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering
    Cancer Center, Neuroblastoma Program Director
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

    Dr. Cheung is working towards finding a cure for cancer. As the director of the Neuroblastoma Program, which deals with nervous system cancer in children usually under the age of five, he divides his time between the lab and his patients equally. With a particular interest in making better and gentler medicines and harnessing the power of the natural immune system, he’s a big thinker who’s excited to see where the future takes us in the fight against cancer.

    Tell us all about your work in pediatric cancer.
    Most folks are unaware that cancer can strike any child at any time, with no rhyme or reason. Nor do they know that pediatric cancer is called an “orphan disease”—pharmaceutical companies have no economic incentives in making new and better drugs for small markets like childhood cancer. So, instead of waiting for miracles, we, as translational scientists, have the responsibility to use our insights to make the next generation of effective medicine. While managing patients afflicted with one of the most deadly cancers in childhood called neuroblastoma, I spent long hours in the laboratory to design new drugs to rejuvenate the immune system—from the test tube to the patient, a process we continue to streamline and accelerate, knowing very well that cancers don’t wait.

    Treating cancer in children is not the same as in a small adult. Pediatric oncologists need to be sure that the cancer will not come back for decades, not just months or years, and that the treatment does not cause damage to vital organs later in life. The new drugs that we work on are now making a real difference in survival. As many of my patients graduate from high schools and colleges, some finishing professional schools, I feel a joy that is deep and hard to describe.

    Is there one anecdote from your professional career that particularly inspires you?
    Sarah* was one of our troopers. She was diagnosed with metastatic neuroblastoma at a very young age, and when her cancer came back and spread to the brain, she was only four years old. Her family and everyone at the hospital were devastated. We were all in despair, especially since this wasn’t supposed to happen—such cases aren’t in the textbooks. I’d had some background from a similar case, where the patient sadly did not make it, and I was able to help Sarah sail through in the end. She’s now remained in remission for seven years, and the successful treatment she received has since helped many other children with brain metastases. This is their legacy.

    For more information, visit mskcc.org
    *Name has been changed.

    The Critical Caregiver
    Dr. Edward E. Conway, Jr.
    Beth Israel Medical Center, Chair, Department of Pediatrics
    (Also St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Interim Chair, Department Of Pediatrics)
    Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

    Dr. Conway spends his time where no new parent wants to be: intensive care. As the director of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, he is in charge of taking care of the sickest infants and children—which, as difficult as that might be, is actually also what he finds the most rewarding about his job. In his practice, he oversees life-threatening illnesses and injuries, including everything from severe asthma and diabetic ketoacidosis to overwhelming infection (i.e. pneumonia) and serious accidents (caused by things like cars, bicycles, scooters, skateboards, and rollerblades).

    What inspired you to work in critical care? What do you love most about it?
    I was always interested in a career in medicine, particularly in pediatrics, because I’ve been amazed at the resiliency of the sickest of children. It’s also humbling to see how parents, grandparents, siblings, and the staff who tirelessly care for these children are affected. I was exposed to dying children very early in my career, and one quickly becomes close with the patient and their family. I have sat vigil through the night more times than I can remember, having discussions about organ donation and withdrawal of support, and I’ve also been at the bedside as my patient passed away and have attended many wakes and funerals. I’m always amazed how the majority of families are grateful for what we attempted, even though we might feel that we have failed as physicians.

    Is there a particular story that really stands out in your mind?
    A 16-year-old boy in the PICU had abnormal blood vessels in his brain that ruptured and bled into his head. He was on a respirator and in a coma for many weeks, and things were looking quite hopeless. One night while I was on-call, the nurses had the television on, and the channel selector was near his hand that he hadn’t moved in weeks. The Chicago Bulls were playing the NY Knicks, and when the nurse went to change the channel, ever so slowly, he grabbed the remote back from her. Over several months he went on to make a full neurologic recovery.

    For more information, visit wehealny.org

    The Accidental Advocate
    Stephen M. Arpadi
    St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center & Beth Israel Medical Center, Associate Attending
    (Also Columbia University College of Physicians And Surgeons, Assistant Professor Of Pediatrics & Public Health)
    Pediatrics

    Dr. Arpadi became an HIV/AIDS doctor by default. He intended to become a primary care pediatrician, but he began his medical career during the middle of the pediatric HIV/AIDS epidemic of the late 1980s. Though he launched into this field accidentally, he’s now been a hero for these patients for 25 years and counting.

    Tell us about the joys and challenges of your specialty.
    The unspeakable loss, sadness, and devastation that HIV has wreaked on so many people in our city is difficult to wrestle with, but the medical and public health achievements that we can manage are incredible and inspiring.

    The early years were about keeping children with HIV/AIDS comfortable and living as “normally” as possible for as long as possible, which often translated to helping them die peacefully. It was the rare child who would survive to their 5th birthday, and only a truly lucky few made it to their 10th. These days, with the availability of effective medications that can control the virus, it’s about helping healthy adolescents and young adults make their way through life, discussing future plans, dating (and sex!) educational and career plans and parenting.

    A number of those I treated during their childhood are in their 30s. This summer I think I did more pre-college physicals than summer camp ones…pretty unbelievable!

    Is there a particular story that really stands out in your mind?
    Yesterday, I saw an adorable and healthy 12-month-old for a routine checkup. To anyone else, this would appear to be a normal visit to the pediatrician, but what was special and apparent to me was that her mom was a survivor of pediatric HIV. When she was her daughter’s age, no one would dare to dream that she would survive her childhood, no less become a mother to a beautiful and healthy daughter.

    During a visit last week, I was asking a handsome and charming 18-year-old to tell me about the college courses he was planning on taking during his first semester. He too was HIV positive, and, at the time of his birth, the encounter we had last week would have been considered a fantasy at best.

    For more information, visit stlukeshospitalnyc.org

    The Mechanic
    Dr. Leo Kron
    St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Senior Attending In Psychiatry
    Pediatric Psychiatry

    Dr. Kron has always been fascinated by why people are the way they are, which naturally led him to a career in psychiatrics. In his practice, he sees children and adolescents who have problems ranging from anxiety and eating disorders to physical illnesses and learning disabilities. All of these can weigh down on not only a child’s development but also on that of his or her family as well. His job is to break down the roots of a problem and engineer the best way to help his patients development optimally.

    What is most challenging in your work as a child psychiatrist?
    The frustrations and challenges of the work are mostly related to the treatment of the more severely ill children, for whom science has been too slow in providing cures or prevention. Families must also deal with great expense and social stigma in the process. It can also be frustrating to have to dedicate precious time to help patients get basic reimbursement for their treatment and medications.

    What is most rewarding about your job?
    Gratification comes from many sources, including the intellectual—the question of what makes people tick has always intrigued me. The current explosion of research in neurobiology expands this enormously fascinating field. Joy also comes from being able to directly help children and their families, sometimes dramatically, with the help of medications and brief therapies, and sometimes more slowly. Problems which are not clearly the result of acute traumatic or medical situations may be chronic or recur at different times across the lifespan, especially when strong stressors re-occur. As a result, over the years, I have intermittently seen little children grow into adults and later into parents themselves.

    What do you love most about your work?
    How people grow is fascinating. Interacting closely with children at different ages and developmental stages offers a great window into that, from the earliest periods when the major ways of communicating are not yet verbal—occurring through play, make-believe, imagination—to the school [years].
    More to the point, I have the privilege of knowing so very personally so many people, young and old, of different persuasions and life experiences—so many eyes on life itself. In the process, my life is expanded. Then, of course, in addition, one is sometimes also granted the great gift of making a difference. It’s always a joy to see the children who I’ve worked with for years, and they feel a bit like family. That constitutes the true “highlight” of my career.

    For more information, visit stlukeshospitalnyc.org

    The Joyous
    Dr. Jennifer Havens
    NYU Langone Medical Center, Vice Chair For Public Psychiatry, Department Of Child And Adolescent Psychiatry, NYU School Of Medicine
    (Also Bellevue Hospital Center, Director and Chief of Service, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
    Child Psychiatry

    Dr. Havens has run the child psychiatry program at Bellevue Hospital, one of the oldest acute care centers for children and adolescents in the US, for the past five years. While she has many professional interests, her primary fascination has always been with the mental health of some of New York’s most complex families—those dealing with abuse and neglect, children and families affected by AIDS and substance abuse, and so forth. Needless to say, her work is tough, but she maintains a sunny attitude and insists on touting the fun parts of the job.

    What are some of the challenges you have to overcome in your field?
    In the past, there was a lot of trivializing or minimizing kids’ mental health problems. People thought in the past that kids couldn’t get depression because their egos aren’t yet developed, but a lot of the work I did with families affected by AIDS showed that even very young children can be depressed when they are stressed enough. Other times, people try to protect kids by not talking through sensitive issues. Fortunately, there’s been a huge growth in understanding of mental health issues in children and adolescents.

    What happens in your program today?
    We started with adolescents who were inpatients. We identified their trauma exposure and implemented groups that help them learn skills to master their emotional responses, which has helped to normalize their experiences and to cope more effectively. For the youngest inpatients, we developed a group intervention for 7- to 12-year-olds. They read a book about a bad thing happening to an animal-like creature, and they can relate to that in a helpful way, then we also teach them skills to calm themselves down. At the end of it, kids have a little bit of mastery over what happened to them, they learn to manage it a bit better and understand that it’s not their fault.

    What would people be most surprised to hear about?
    How much fun it is. People always ask me, “Isn’t your work depressing?” But never have I felt that way about my work. Children and adolescents are open to the joy and love there is in the world. They are ready to share that with us. We just have to reach it.

    For more information, visit nyc.gov/html/hhc/bellevue

    The Fit Maker
    Dr. Dyan Hes
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, Clinical Assistant Professor Of Pediatrics
    (Also Gramercy Pediatrics, Medical Director)
    Pediatrics, Obesity

    You might not connect an obesity doctor with our city’s favorite spooky holiday, but Dr. Hes does inspire Halloween costumes. Hes, who opened up her own private practice last spring and teaches as an assistant professor of pediatrics at Weill, says that her biggest honor was to be on the inaugural American Board of Obesity Medicine last year. Like all of us, she loves working in the cultural mecca that is New York City.

    What would people be surprised to know about what you do?
    Despite the obesity epidemic in New York City, there are very few doctors trained in this specialty for pediatrics. I see referrals from all over the Tri-State area. I help educate families about proper nutrition and lifestyles. My methods are easy to follow and I have had much success in this area, where people often feel hopeless. I treat children who are already overweight and children who are at risk.

    What do you love about your job the most?
    I love seeing families in my office and growing with them. I love walking down the street and seeing my patients, especially when they run up and give me a hug. One of my fondest memories was when my patient’s mom brought me a Halloween photo of her children. They insisted on dressing up as Dr. Hes on Halloween. They put on doctor’s kits and scrubs and wrote nametags that said “Dr. Hes.” They were so proud of their costumes. These small memories are what make being a pediatrician so rewarding.

    What has surprised you the most in your career?
    There have been two great surprises for me since I opened my own office. One is the vast diversity of my patients. New York is a cultural mecca, and I have patients from all corners of the Earth. Getting to know these families makes my job more interesting. Secondly, I have been truly surprised by the large percentage of newborns in my practice; there’s a real baby boom downtown.

    For more information, visit gramercypediatrics.com

    The Butt Maker
    Dr. Francisca Velcek
    Lenox Hill Hospital, Pediatric Surgeon
    Pediatric Surgery

    Dr. Velcek always gets a laugh when her daughter tells friends that her mother’s job is to “make new butts”—a reference to a surgery that helps normalize the bowels. As a pediatric surgeon and a professor of surgery, Velcek deals with problems big and small, but she loves that she almost always makes a life-lasting impact.

    What is it that you love most about your job?
    The surgical problems of children can be very simple or very complex, but most of the things we do can make patients well for the rest of their lives—which means making an impact that lasts at least 70 years. Sometimes we have patients who we operated on or cared for when they were babies who even come back with their children, who may have the same problem as they had when they were young.

    Is there a particular operation that you perform which has the greatest impact on a child’s life?
    My daughter always tells her friends and classmates that her mom’s favorite operation is “to make new butts.” She means that I operate on children with imperforate anus (a congenitally blocked or missing opening to the anus) to help these children to have normal lives and be able to move their bowels normally.
    I think the imperforate anus operation is one of the best operations because it has the greatest impact on a person’s life—it’s good for the entire lifetime. I still remember the first baby I operated on with this problem. It was such a joy to see this baby with a normal bowel movement, and there have been many such cases since then.

    Are there any specific operations that you performed that really stand out in your mind in your career?
    A very special case was that of a five-year-old Jehovah’s Witness who had a huge tumor in the chest, compressing her entire lung and causing her severe respiratory problems whenever she got sick. Because of her religion, a blood transfusion was out of the question—as was the typical, major operation for removing the tumor. After being met with numerous refusals to operate, followed by introductions of major radical operative maneuvers, they finally decided to come to Long Island College Hospital because of our bloodless program. I had done a similar case and was hopeful about removing the tumor in a less invasive manner than previously advised. Suffice it to say that this young lady is now in college and comes to New York to visit me.

    For more information, visit lenoxhillhospital.org


    THE DOCTORS

    CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

    A Reese Abright
    Elmhurst Hospital Center
    140 East 40th Street, 212-867-3131
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD, Anxiety Disorders)

    Abraham S. Bartell
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    646-888-0200
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychiatry in Cancer, Psychiatry in Physical Illness)

    Ina Becker
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    262 Central Park West
    917-441-0880
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

    Hector R. Bird
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    300 West 72nd Street
    212-874-5311
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (ADD/ADHD, Anxiety & Depression, Personality Disorders, Conduct Disorder)

    Roy Boorady
    Child Mind Institute
    445 Park Avenue
    212-308-3118
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychopharmacology, Bipolar/Mood Disorders)

    Lynn Burkes
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    185 West End Avenue
    212-362-5920
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Diagnostic Problems, ADD/ADHD, Divorce/Family Issues, Developmental Disorders)

    Barbara J. Coffey
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    577 First Avenue, 212-263-3926
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Tourette’s Syndrome, ADD/ADHD, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Psychopharmacology)

    Sarah J. Fox
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    210 West 89th Street, 212-874-4558
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
    (Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Eating Disorders, Psychoanalysis)

    Vilma Gabbay
    NYU Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
    577 First Avenue
    212-263-3654
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Depression)

    Jennifer Havens
    NYU Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
    577 First Avenue, 646-754-4944
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety Disorders, Bereavement/Traumatic Grief)

    Margaret E. Hertzig
    NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68th Street, 212-746-5712
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Developmental Disorders, ADD/ADHD)

    Glenn S. Hirsch
    NYU Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
    577 First Avenue, 212-263-8704
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Tourette’s Syndrome, Bipolar/Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD)

    Harold S. Koplewicz
    Child Mind Institute
    445 Park Avenue
    212-308-3118
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Psychopharmacology, ADD/ADHD)

    Leo L. Kron
    St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center
    30 East 76th Street
    212-861-7001
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychopharmacology, Psychotherapy)

    Bennett Leventhal
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    577 First Avenue
    212-263-8696
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Autism, ADD/ADHD, Psychopharmacology)

    Owen Lewis
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    11 East 87th Street
    212-996-8196
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychotherapy, Psychopharmacology)

    Donna L. Moreau
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    110 East End Avenue
    212-772-9205
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychotherapy & Psychopharmacology, Anxiety & Mood Disorders)

    Jeffrey H. Newcorn
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    One Gustave L. Levy Place
    212-659-8705
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Psychopharmacology, ADD/ADHD, Developmental Disorders, Behavioral Disorders)

    Richard Perry
    Bellevue Hospital Center
    55 West 74th Street
    212-595-0116
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Pervasive Development Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Psychopharmacology)

    Jess P. Shatkin
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    577 First Avenue
    212-263-4769
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Autism, Anxiety & Mood Disorders, ADD/ADHD)

    Raul R. Silva
    Child Mind Institute
    445 Park Avenue
    212-308-3118
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Autism, ADD/ADHD, Depression, Psychopharmacology)

    Elizabeth Kay Spencer
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    121 East 31st Street
    212-684-3810
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

    Stanley K. Turecki
    Lenox Hill Hospital
    136 East 64th Street
    212-355-2535
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Temperamentally Difficult Child, ADD/ADHD, Parenting Issues)

    John T. Walkup
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68th Street
    212-746-1891
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Anxiety Disorders)

    Peter Walsh
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    115 Central Park West
    212-579-5552
    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

    CHILD NEUROLOGY

    Jeffrey C. Allen
    Hassenfeld Childrens Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
    160 East 32nd Street
    212-263-9907
    Child Neurology (Neuro-Oncology, Brain Tumors)

    Darryl C. De Vivo
    Neurological Institute at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia
    University Medical Center
    710 West 168th Street
    212-305-5244
    Child Neurology (Metabolic Disorders, Neuromuscular Disorders, Spinal Muscular Atrophy)

    David M. Kaufman
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    3 East 83rd Street
    212-737-4911
    Child Neurology (Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders, Headache, Learning Disorders, Autism)

    Barry Kosofsky
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
    Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street, 212-746-3321
    Child Neurology (Developmental Disorders, Autism, Stroke)

    Daniel K. Miles
    NYU Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
    223 East 34th Street, 646-558-0808
    Child Neurology (Pediatric Neurology, Tuberous Sclerosis, Epilepsy)

    Walter J. Molofsky
    Beth Israel Medical Center
    10 Union Square East, 212-844-6910
    Child Neurology (Seizure Disorders, Headache, ADD/ADHD, Stroke)

    Ruth D. Nass
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    577 First Avenue, 212-263-7753
    Child Neurology (Autism, ADD/ADHD, Learning Disorders, Migraine)

    James J. Riviello Jr.
    NYU Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
    223 East 34th Street, 646-558-0808
    Child Neurology (Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders, Epilepsy in Tuberous Sclerosis, Electrical Status Epilepticus of Sleep)

    Steven M. Wolf
    Beth Israel Medical Center
    10 Union Square East
    212-844-6944
    Child Neurology (Epilepsy, Headache, Migraine, Pediatric Neurology)

    PEDIATRIC ALLERGY & IMMUNOLOGY

    Paul M. Ehrlich
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary
    35 East 35th Street
    212-685-4225
    Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Asthma, Food Allergy)

    Hugh A. Sampson
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    5 East 98th Street
    212-241-5548
    Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Food Allergy, Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma)

    Scott H. Sicherer
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    5 East 98th Street
    212-241-5548
    Pediatric Allergy & Immunology (Food Allergy, Drug Sensitivity, Eczema)

    PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY

    Linda J. Addonizio
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-6575
    Pediatric Cardiology
    (Transplant Medicine-Heart, Heart Failure, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy)

    Karen Altmann
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-342-1560
    Pediatric Cardiology
    (Congenital Heart Disease, Echocardiograph)

    Rica G. Arnon
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1468 Madison Avenue
    212-241-7672
    Pediatric Cardiology (Congenital Heart Disease, Exercise Physiology)

    Morton D. Borg
    Beth Israel Medical Center
    10 Union Square East
    212-844-8313
    Pediatric Cardiology (Fetal Echocardiography)

    David H. Brick
    Village Pediatric Cardiology at NYU Langone Medical Center
    154 West 14th Street
    212-604-7880
    Pediatric Cardiology (Fetal Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease)

    Patrick A. Flynn
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68th Street
    212-746-3561
    Pediatric Cardiology
    (Congenital Heart Disease, Echocardiography, Marfan’s Syndrome, Cardiac Catheterization)

    Bruce D. Gelb
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1468 Madison Avenue
    212-241-8592
    Pediatric Cardiology
    (Transplant Medicine-Heart, Marfan’s Syndrome, Noonan Syndrome)

    Barry A. Love
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1468 Madison Avenue
    212-241-9516
    Pediatric Cardiology (Cardiac Catheterization, Interventional Cardiology, Atrial Septal Defect, Arrhythmias)

    Ira A. Parness
    Mount Sinai Medical Center:
    1468 Madison Avenue
    212-241-6640
    Pediatric Cardiology (Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease, Fetal Echocardiography)

    David E. Solowiejczyk
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-4432
    Pediatric Cardiology (Echocardiography)

    Robert J. Sommer
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    161 Fort Washington Avenue
    212-342-7060
    Pediatric Cardiology
    (Congenital Heart Disease, Atrial Septal Defect, Cardiac Catheterization)

    Thomas J. Starc
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-4432
    Pediatric Cardiology (Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders)

    L. Gary Steinberg
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68 Street
    212-746-3561
    Pediatric Cardiology (Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease)

    Laurel J. Steinherz
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-8103
    Pediatric Cardiology (Cardiac Effects of Cancer/Cancer Therapy)

    PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE

    Edward E. Conway, Jr.
    Beth Israel Medical Center
    350 East 17th Street
    212-420-4018
    Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (Neurologic Critical Care, Respiratory Failure, Head Injury)

    Bruce M. Greenwald
    NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68th Street
    212-746-3056
    Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (Respiratory Failure, Sepsis & Septic Shock, Asthma, Diabetes Ketoacidosis)

    Mayer Sagy
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    550 First Avenue
    212-263-6425
    Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

    PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY

    Ilene Fennoy
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    622 West 168 Street
    212-305-6559
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth/Development Disorders, Diabetes, Klinefelter’s Syndrome, Obesity)

    Bonita H. Franklin
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    109 Reade Street
    212-732-2401
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes, Growth Disorders, Thyroid Disorders)

    Mary P. Gallagher
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    1150 Saint Nicholas Avenue
    212-851-5494
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes)

    Brenda Kohn
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    160 East 32nd Sreet
    212-263-3185
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth Disorders, Pituitary Disorders, Thyroid Disorders, Adrenal Disorders)

    Noel K. Maclaren
    Lenox Hill Hospital
    200 West 57th Street
    212-371-0658
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes, Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome)

    Maria I. New
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    5 East 98th Street
    212-241-8210
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Adrenal Disorders, Growth/Development Disorders)

    Sharon E. Oberfield
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway, 212-305-6559
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Adrenal Disorders, Neuroendocrine Growth Disorders, Growth Disorders)

    Robert Rapaport
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    468 Madison Avenue
    212-241-8487
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes, Thyroid Disorders, Growth Disorders)

    Charles A. Sklar
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-8138
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Cancer Survivors-Late Effects of Therapy, Growth Disorders in Childhood Cancer, Pituitary Disorders)

    Alfred E. Slonim
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    622 West 168th Street
    212-305-5717
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Muscular Disorders-Metabolic, Inflammatory Bowel Disease/Crohn’s, Glycogen Storage Diseases, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome)

    Ileana Vargas-Rodriguez
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    1150 Street Nicholas Avenue
    212-851-5494
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Diabetes)

    Maria G. Vogiatzi
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street
    212-746-3462
    Pediatric Endocrinology (Growth Disorders, Osteoporosis, Pubertal Disorders, Adrenal Disorders)

    PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

    Babu S. Bangaru
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    530 First Avenue, 212-263-7868
    Pediatric Gastroenterology (Ulcerative Colitis/Crohn’s, Liver Disease, Nutrition, Endoscopy)

    Keith J. Benkov
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    5 East 98th Street
    212-241-5415
    Pediatric Gastroenterology (Inflammatory Bowel Disease/Crohn’s, Liver Disease, Celiac Disease)

    Philip G. Kazlow
    Morgan Stanley
    Children’s Hospital of
    NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-5903
    Pediatric Gastroenterology (Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Celiac Disease, Nutrition)

    Joseph Levy
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    160 East 32nd Street
    212-263-5407
    Pediatric Gastroenterology (Celiac Disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Gastroesophageal
    Reflux Disease, Nutrition
    in Autism)

    Steven Lobritto
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-3000
    Pediatric Gastroenterology (Hepatitis, Liver Disease, Transplant Medicine-Liver)

    Robbyn E. Sockolow
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street
    646-962-3869
    Pediatric Gastroenterology (Constipation, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease/Crohn’s, Capsule Endoscopy)

    William Spivak
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    177 East 87th Street
    212-369-7700
    Pediatric Gastroenterology (Inflammatory Bowel Disease/Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Feeding Disorders)

    PEDIATRIC HEMOTOLOGY-ONCOLOGY

    Alexander Aledo
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68th Street
    212-746-3494
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Leukemia, Lymphoma, Bone Tumors)

    Francine Blei
    St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Vascular Birthmark Institute of New York
    26 West 60th Street
    212-523-8931
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Hemangiomas, Vascular Anomalies, Vascular Malformations, Lymphedema)

    James Bussel
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68th Street
    212-746-3400
    Pediatric Hematology-
    Oncology (Bleeding/Coagulation Disorders, Platelet Disorders, Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome)

    William L. Carroll
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    160 East 32nd Street
    212-263-8400
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Leukemia)

    Nai-Kong V. Cheung
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    646-888-2313
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Neuroblastoma)

    Ira J. Dunkel
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-2153
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Retinoblastoma, Brain & Spinal Cord Tumors, Brain Tumors, Pediatric Cancers)

    Sharon L. Gardner
    Steven B. Hassenfeld Childrens Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
    160 East 32nd Street
    212-263-9913
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Neuro-Oncology)

    James H. Garvin
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    161 Fort Washington Avenue
    212-305-5808
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Brain Tumors, Pediatric Cancers, Bone Marrow Transplant)

    Patricia-Jane V. Giardina
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    525 East 68th Street
    212-746-3400
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Thalassemia)

    Margaret Karpatkin
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    550 First Avenue
    212-263-6428
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Anemia, Thrombotic Disorders)

    Nancy A. Kernan
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-7250
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Leukemia, Immune Deficiency, Bone Marrow Transplant, Stem Cell Transplant)

    Kim Kramer
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-6410
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Neuroblastoma, Brain & Spinal Cord Tumors)

    Brian H. Kushner
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    275 York Avenue
    212-639-6793
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Neuroblastoma, Bone Marrow Transplant, Immunotherapy)

    Judith R. Marcus
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    161 Fort Wasthington Avenue
    212-305-5808
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Leukemia, Lymphoma, Bleeding/Coagulation Disorders, Thrombocytopenic Purpura)

    Paul A. Meyers
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-5952
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Pediatric Cancers, Bone Tumors, Sarcoma)

    Richard J. O’Reilly
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-5957
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Bone Marrow Transplant)

    Peter G. Steinherz
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-7951
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology
    Leukemia & Lymphoma,Pediatric Cancers,Wilms’ Tumor

    Michael A. Weiner
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    161 Fort Washington Avenue
    212-305-9770
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Lymphoma, Leukemia)

    Leonard H. Wexler
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    275 York Avenue
    212-639-7990
    Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (Rhabdomyosarcoma, Bone Cancer, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Sarcoma-Soft Tissue)

    PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    William Borkowsky
    NYU Langone Medical Centrer
    550 First Avenue
    212-263-6513
    Pediatric Infectious Disease (AIDS/HIV)

    John G. Larsen
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1245 Park Avenue
    212-427-0540
    Pediatric Infectious Disease

    Natalie M. Neu
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    630 West 168th Street
    212-305-4558
    Pediatric Infectious Disease (AIDS/HIV, Sexually Transmitted Diseases)

    Lisa Saiman
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-9446
    Pediatric Infectious Disease (Cystic Fibrosis Infection, Fungal Infections, Tick-borne Diseases, Tuberculosis)

    PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY

    Valerie L. Johnson
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street
    646-962-4324
    Pediatric Nephrology (Nephrotic Syndrome, Glomerulonephritis, Hypertension, Transplant Medicine-Kidney)

    Eduardo M. Perelstein
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street
    646-962-4324
    Pediatric Nephrology (Kidney Failure, Glomerulonephritis, Hypertension)

    Jeffrey M. Saland
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    5 East 98th Street
    212-241-6187
    Pediatric Nephrology (Transplant Medicine-Kidney, Kidney Disease, Hypertension in Children, Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome)

    Howard Trachtman
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    160 East 32nd Street
    212-263-5940
    Pediatric Nephrology (Electrolyte Disorders, Hypertension, Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Electrolyte Disturbances)

    PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY

    Max M. April
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    428 East 72nd Street
    646-962-2224
    Pediatric Otolaryngology (Sinus Disorders, Neck Masses, Laryngeal Disorders, Sleep Apnea)

    Jay N. Dolitsky
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary
    261 Fifth Avenue
    212-679-3499
    Pediatric Otolaryngology (Ear Infections, Neck Masses, Choanal Atresia, Tonsil/Adenoid Disorders)

    Joseph Haddad Jr.
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-8933
    Pediatric Otolaryngology (Ear Infections, Sinus Disorders, Cleft Palate/Lip)

    Jacqueline E. Jones
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    1175 Park Avenue
    212-996-2559
    Pediatric Otolaryngology (Sinus Disorders/Surgery, Ear Infections)

    Michael A. Rothschild
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    212-996-2995
    1175 Park Ave
    Pediatric Otolaryngology (Choanal Atresia, Neck Masses, Sinusitis, Ear Disorders)

    Robert F. Ward
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    428 East 72nd Street
    646-962-2224
    Pediatric Otolaryngology (Airway Disorders, Sinus Disorders/Surgery, Choanal Atresia)

    PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY

    Mary F.A.C. Di Maio
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    1440 York Avenue
    212-988-5008
    Pediatric Pulmonology (Cystic Fibrosis, Asthma, Allergy)

    Meyer Kattan
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-5122
    Pediatric Pulmonology (Asthma, Cystic Fibrosis, Chronic Lung Disease)

    Carin Lamm
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-5122
    Pediatric Pulmonology (Sleep Disorders, Asthma)

    Gerald M. Loughlin
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street
    646-962-3410
    Pediatric Pulmonology (Sleep Disorders/Apnea, Swallowing Disorders, Asthma & Chronic Lung Disease, Breathing Disorders)

    Andrew S. Ting
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    5 East 98th Street
    212-241-7788
    Pediatric Pulmonology (Asthma, Cystic Fibrosis, Bronchoscopy, Cough)

    PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY

    Andrew H. Eichenfield
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway, 212-305-9304
    Pediatric Rheumatology (Juvenile Arthritis, Lyme Disease, Lupus/SLE)

    Herbert M. Lazarus
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    390 West End Avenue
    212-787-1444
    Pediatric Rheumatology (Juvenile Arthritis, Lyme Disease, Pain-Musculoskeletal)

    Thomas J.A. Lehman
    Hospital for Special Surgery
    535 East 70th Street
    212-606-1151
    Pediatric Rheumatology (Arthritis, Scleroderma, Lupus/SLE, Dermatomyositis)

    PEDIATRIC SURGERY

    Lawrence Bodenstein
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-342-8586
    Pediatric Surgery

    Arthur Cooper
    Harlem Hospital Center
    506 Lenox Avenue
    Pediatric Surgery (Endoscopy, Trauma, Disaster Preparedness, Child Abuse)
    212-939-4003

    Howard B. Ginsburg
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    530 First Avenue
    212-263-7391
    Pediatric Surgery (Neonatal Surgery, Tumor Surgery, Pediatric Urology, Gastrointestinal Surgery)

    Michael P. La Quaglia
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    1275 York Avenue
    212-639-7002
    Pediatric Surgery (Cancer Surgery, Neuroblastoma, Liver Cancer, Colon & Rectal Cancer)

    William Middlesworth
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-342-8585
    Pediatric Surgery

    Jan M. Quaegebeur
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    3959 Broadway
    212-305-5975
    Pediatric Surgery (Arterial Switch, Heart Valve Surgery, Pediatric Cardiac Surgery)

    Nitsana A. Spigland
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street
    212-746-5648
    Pediatric Surgery
    (Congenital Anomalies, Pediatric Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery)

    Francisca T. Velcek
    Lenox Hill Hospital
    965 Fifth Ave
    212-744-9396
    Pediatric Surgery
    Anorectal Malformations,Pediatric Gynecology,Neonatal Surgery,Hernia

    PEDIATRICS

    Dennis Allendorf
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    401 West 118th Street
    212-666-4610
    Pediatrics (Congenital Anomalies)

    Stephen M. Arpadi
    St. Luke’s-Roosevelt
    Hospital Center
    1111 Amsterdam Avenue
    212-523-3847
    Pediatrics (AIDS/HIV)

    Felicia B. Axelrod
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    530 First Avenue
    212-263-7225
    Pediatrics (Dysautonomia)

    Bruce J. Brovender
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    1559 York Avenue
    212-585-3329
    Pediatrics

    Harris E. Burstin
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    317 East 34th Street
    212-725-6300
    Pediatrics (Asthma, Allergy, Critical Care)

    Michel A. Cohen
    NYU Langone Medical Center, Tribeca Pediatrics, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    46 Warren Street
    212-226-7666
    Pediatrics (Child Development, Sleep Disorders)

    Jennifer E. Cross
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    505 East 70th Street
    646-962-4303
    Pediatrics (Learning Disorders, Child Development, Behavioral Disorders)

    Gary S. Edelstein
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    16 East 60th Street
    212-326-3351
    Pediatrics

    Genevieve E. Ferrier
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    46 West 11th Street
    212-529-4330
    Pediatrics (Developmental & Behavioral Disorders)

    Stephanie B. Freilich
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1125 Park Avenue
    212-289-1400
    Pediatrics

    Judith Goldstein
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    1559 York Avenue
    212-585-3329
    Pediatrics (Newborn Care, Infectious Disease)

    Dyan S. Hes
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    67 Irving Place
    212-473-4200
    Pediatrics (Obesity, Weight Management)

    Sarla Inaar
    Metropolitan Hospital Center
    1901 First Avenue
    212-423-6228
    Pediatrics (Rheumatology)

    Max A. Kahn
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    390 West End Avenue
    212-787-1444
    Pediatrics

    Marie B. Keith
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    552 Broadway
    212-334-3366
    Pediatrics

    Neal M. Kotin
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1125 Park Avenue
    212-289-1400
    Pediatrics (Asthma, Bronchitis, Sleep Disorders, Pulmonary Disease)

    Signe S. Larson
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1245 Park Avenue
    212-427-0540
    Pediatrics (Pediatric Endocrinology)

    George M. Lazarus
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    106 East 78th Street
    212-744-0840
    Pediatrics

    Susan E. Levitzky
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    161 Madison Avenue
    212-213-1960
    Pediatrics (Asthma, Child Development, Adoption &
    Foster Care)

    Cecelia McCarton
    Montefiore Medical Center for Developmental Pediatrics
    350 East 82nd Street
    212-996-9019
    Pediatrics (Autism, Learning Disorders, ADD/ADHD, Developmental Disorders)

    Margaret T. McHugh
    Bellevue Hospital Center
    462 First Avenue
    212-562-5524
    Pediatrics (Child Abuse, Adolescent Medicine)

    Louis G. Monti
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    55 East 87th Street
    212-722-0707
    Pediatrics (Infectious Disease)

    Ramon J.C. Murphy
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1245 Park Avenue
    212-427-0540
    Pediatrics (Community Medicine)

    Meryl Newman-Cedar
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    215 East 79th Street
    212-737-7800
    Pediatrics (Child Development)

    Kevin Oeffinger
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    300 East 66th Street
    646-888-4730
    Pediatrics (Cancer Survivors, Late Effects of Therapy)

    Eric Sin-Kam Poon
    New York Downtown Hospital
    170 William Street, 212-312-5350
    Pediatrics (Asthma, Pediatric Cardiology, Developmental Disorders)

    Laura Popper
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    116 East 66th Street
    212-794-2136
    Pediatrics

    Paula J. Prezioso
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    317 East 34th Street
    212-725-6300
    Pediatrics (Behavioral Disorders)

    Alice S. Prince
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    650 West 168th Street
    212-305-4558
    Pediatrics (Infectious Disease)

    Harold S. Raucher
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1125 Park Avenue
    212-289-1400
    Pediatrics (Infectious Disease, Travel Medicine)

    Lori J. Rosello
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    46 West 11th Street
    212-529-4330
    Pediatrics

    Michael Rosenbaum
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    450 West End Avenue
    212-769-3070
    Pediatrics (Nutrition, Growth Disorders, Obesity)

    Suzanne Rosenfeld
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, West End Pediatrics
    450 West End Avenue
    212-769-3070
    Pediatrics (Developmental Disorders, Asthma)

    Ira M. Sacker
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    19 West 34th Street
    212-268-4440
    Pediatrics (Eating Disorders, Obesity)

    Marie V. Sanford
    NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center
    12 West 72nd Street
    646-962-7800
    Pediatrics

    Barney Softness
    Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian
    1150 Saint Nicholas Avenue
    212-851-5494
    Pediatrics (Diabetes)

    Barry B. Stein
    Mount Sinai Medical Center
    1125 Park Avenue, 212-289-1400
    Pediatrics (Developmental & Behavioral Disorders)

    Michael R. Traister
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    390 West End Avenue
    212-787-1444
    Pediatrics (Adoption & Foster Care)

    Sylvain M. Weinberge
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    51 East 25th Street, 212-598-0331
    Pediatrics & Neonatal Medicine (Prematurity/Low Birth Weight Infants)

    Sol S. Zimmerman
    NYU Langone Medical Center
    317 East 34th Street
    212-725-6300
    Pediatrics (Growth/Development Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Cough-Tic Syndrome)


    ABOUT CASTLE CONNOLLY

    Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is a healthcare research and information company founded in 1991 by a former medical college board chairman and president to help guide consumers to America’s top doctors and top hospitals. Castle Connolly’s established survey and research process, under the direction of an MD, involves tens of thousands of top doctors and the medical leadership of leading hospitals.

    Castle Connolly’s physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select top doctors on both the national and regional levels. Its online nominations process – located at www.castleconnolly.com/nominations – is open to all licensed physicians in America who are able to nominate physicians in any medical specialty and in any part of the country, as well as indicate whether the nominated physicians is, in their opinion, among the best in their region in their medical specialty or among the best in the nation in their medical specialty. Careful screening of doctors’ educational and professional experience is essential before final selection is made among those physicians most highly regarded by their peers. The result – we identify the top doctors in America and provide you, the consumer, with detailed information about their education, training and special expertise in our paperback guides, national and regional magazine “Top Doctors” features and online directories.

    Doctors do not and cannot pay to be selected and profiled as Castle Connolly Top Doctors.

    Physicians selected for inclusion in this magazine’s “Top Doctors” feature may also appear as Regional Top Doctors online at www.castleconnolly.com, or in one of Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors™ guides, such as America’s Top Doctors® or America’s Top Doctors® for Cancer.