March 28, 2012

Bump It Up


April’s Editor’s Note

By Eric Messinger


There is an image of a baby
bump—actually, two baby bumps—that I’ll never forget. Picture my wife and
her good friend Patti, former college roommates, both around 40 and ready to
give birth in two days. With nothing to do but rest, they took up
positions at either end of our couch—two chatty, beautiful and big-bellied
bookends—while I catered to their every need. The moment I took their
picture, I knew it was a belly shot for the ages. Now, I have another one.

I generally don’t like the way
magazines photograph pregnant women—with the stress on them to look brazenly
naked and heavenly maternal. For this month’s cover, we took a different
approach. Alexis Maybank was over eight months pregnant when we had our cover shoot,
and doesn’t she look as stylish and gracious as one might expect from the
e-commerce buccaneer who co-founded Gilt Groupe? Don’t her and her old friend, Gilt
Co-Founder Alexandra Wilkis Wilson, look great? 

Two NYC moms, Alexis and Alexandra
each have their own families, but as you might imagine, their lives are
inextricably connected. My favorite part of our cover interview is when
they explain how they’ve even come to complement each other as
parents—Alexandra being the organized one who does the research; Alexis being
the adventurous one who favors her instincts in letting kids be kids. But
I suspect that many of you will enjoy their shop talk as well: designers,
fashion, travel, a new book…just to name a few of their passions and endeavors.

I especially love having a baby
bump on this particular cover because it’s a
perfect emblem for an issue filled with good stories for new and expectant
parents, and for our biggest annual event—The New York Baby Show—coming up in
mid-May.  

Want to know how to put together a
wonderful registry with minimal stress
? This issue’s got you covered,
while also catering to our families with older kids with helpful stories on
biking in the city and finding the right day camp, among others. 

Of course, I wish I had a second
Editor’s Note to tell you all about The New York Baby Show, but suffice it to
say, big bellies, infants and toddlers are welcome! And for more, visit newyorkbabyshow.com.  

Happy April Everyone, 

ERIC MESSINGER
EDITOR

emessinger@manhattanmedia.com

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March 17, 2011

Bump It Up


Leading Experts Share Their Exercise Do’s And Don’ts For A Healthy Pregnancy And Delivery

By New York Family


Staying healthy during pregnancy is a priority for every mom-to-be, but
figuring out a fitness plan can be overwhelming, as there seems to be a gray
area between what types of exercise are healthy, and which are potentially
dangerous. For advice, we turned to a few NYC experts who specialize in prenatal
fitness and health—Sheryl Wilson, CPT, Esq.
and the founder of Fitnotic; Julianna Sechhes, director of prenatal yoga at Karma
Kids Yoga
; and Anna Merrill, co-owner of Birthday Presence, a Lamaze-certified childbirth educator and
DONA-certified labor support doula. Of course, while we hope these tips
will help get you started, all moms-to-be should consult their health care
providers before embarking on any exercise regime.


DO work up a sweat.
 Exercise during pregnancy has
numerous benefits for moms-to-be, including a more comfortable pregnancy with
less aches and pains, a shorter and easier labor and a quicker return to
pre-pregnancy shape. Exercise can also decrease the risk of developing
complications like gestational diabetes or high blood pressure. Merrill
recommends that pregnant women try to engage in some form of physical activity
for 30 minutes most days of the week (walking counts!).

DON’T overdo it. Women who weren’t
exercising regularly before their pregnancy should keep their routines simple. However,
just because a woman wasn’t a strict athlete before becoming pregnant doesn’t
mean she can’t get moving. “Women who
previously were not very active can slowly increase the duration of their daily
walks, or try swimming or a yoga class,” says Merill. “Pregnancy can serve as a
great motivator for improving health!” Experts recommend that all pregnant
women stay away from high-intensity exercise, contact sports or any activity
with a high potential for falling, as a woman’s center of gravity changes
during pregnancy. “A good rule of thumb is that expectant moms should be
able to carry on a conversation throughout their workout,” says Wilson.
Merrill also advises that after the first trimester, any activity where the mom-to-be is lying on her back should be avoided.

DO find your Zen. Calming
exercises like yoga help women not only strengthen their bodies and improve
flexibility, but also to de-stress and connect with their babies. “It’s
important to connect mom and baby early on,” Sechhes says. “The stronger the
bond, the better the pregnancy will be. When the pregnancy is a positive experience,
motherhood likely will be as well.”

DO drink up. Staying hydrated is
important for everyone, but it’s especially imperative during pregnancy, as
water helps to carry nutrients through the blood to the baby. “Aside from alleviating
side effects like nausea, constipation and swelling, water may help prevent
urinary tract infections and the onset of premature labor,” says Wilson, who
recommends that moms-to-be try to drink a minimum of eight glasses of water
each day and carry a bottle of water with them at all times.

DON’T obsess over the scale. While it’s a good thing to
be mindful of your weight gain, constantly stepping on the scale can be a
source of unnecessary stress. “My advice is to listen only to your health care
provider,” says
Wilson. “If [he or she] isn’t
concerned about your weight, you shouldn’t be either.
Stay as
active as possible, eat sensibly, take your vitamins and embrace your beautiful
prenatal body.”

DO get together. Pairing up
with another mom-to-be or joining a prenatal fitness class (see sidebar for
programs in NYC) is a great way to share your experience and create a support
system. “Pregnancy can be overwhelming and isolating at times,” says Sechhes. “We
encourage expectant moms to connect with each other and to surround themselves
with people they trust, from the obstetrician to the fitness instructor.”

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March 17, 2011

Bump It Up


Leading Experts Share Their Exercise Do’s And Don’ts For A Healthy Pregnancy And Delivery

By New York Family


Staying healthy during pregnancy is a priority for every mom-to-be, but
figuring out a fitness plan can be overwhelming, as there seems to be a gray
area between what types of exercise are healthy, and which are potentially
dangerous. For advice, we turned to a few NYC experts who specialize in prenatal
fitness and health—Sheryl Wilson, CPT, Esq.
and the founder of Fitnotic; Julianna Sechhes, director of prenatal yoga at Karma
Kids Yoga
; and Anna Merrill, co-owner of Birthday Presence, a Lamaze-certified childbirth educator and
DONA-certified labor support doula. Of course, while we hope these tips
will help get you started, all moms-to-be should consult their health care
providers before embarking on any exercise regime.


DO work up a sweat.
 Exercise during pregnancy has
numerous benefits for moms-to-be, including a more comfortable pregnancy with
less aches and pains, a shorter and easier labor and a quicker return to
pre-pregnancy shape. Exercise can also decrease the risk of developing
complications like gestational diabetes or high blood pressure. Merrill
recommends that pregnant women try to engage in some form of physical activity
for 30 minutes most days of the week (walking counts!).

DON’T overdo it. Women who weren’t
exercising regularly before their pregnancy should keep their routines simple. However,
just because a woman wasn’t a strict athlete before becoming pregnant doesn’t
mean she can’t get moving. “Women who
previously were not very active can slowly increase the duration of their daily
walks, or try swimming or a yoga class,” says Merill. “Pregnancy can serve as a
great motivator for improving health!” Experts recommend that all pregnant
women stay away from high-intensity exercise, contact sports or any activity
with a high potential for falling, as a woman’s center of gravity changes
during pregnancy. “A good rule of thumb is that expectant moms should be
able to carry on a conversation throughout their workout,” says Wilson.
Merrill also advises that after the first trimester, any activity where the mom-to-be is lying on her back should be avoided.

DO find your Zen. Calming
exercises like yoga help women not only strengthen their bodies and improve
flexibility, but also to de-stress and connect with their babies. “It’s
important to connect mom and baby early on,” Sechhes says. “The stronger the
bond, the better the pregnancy will be. When the pregnancy is a positive experience,
motherhood likely will be as well.”

DO drink up. Staying hydrated is
important for everyone, but it’s especially imperative during pregnancy, as
water helps to carry nutrients through the blood to the baby. “Aside from alleviating
side effects like nausea, constipation and swelling, water may help prevent
urinary tract infections and the onset of premature labor,” says Wilson, who
recommends that moms-to-be try to drink a minimum of eight glasses of water
each day and carry a bottle of water with them at all times.

DON’T obsess over the scale. While it’s a good thing to
be mindful of your weight gain, constantly stepping on the scale can be a
source of unnecessary stress. “My advice is to listen only to your health care
provider,” says
Wilson. “If [he or she] isn’t
concerned about your weight, you shouldn’t be either.
Stay as
active as possible, eat sensibly, take your vitamins and embrace your beautiful
prenatal body.”

DO get together. Pairing up
with another mom-to-be or joining a prenatal fitness class (see sidebar for
programs in NYC) is a great way to share your experience and create a support
system. “Pregnancy can be overwhelming and isolating at times,” says Sechhes. “We
encourage expectant moms to connect with each other and to surround themselves
with people they trust, from the obstetrician to the fitness instructor.”

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Find more great articles like this in our

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